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Property Manager

Also known as: 

Reserve Manager; Country Park Manager; Estate Manager.

Job Description: 

Property Managers balance the demands of access, conservation and financial management for large areas of natural and cultural heritage.

A Property Manager has overall operational responsibility for a property and its contact with the general public. They ensure that the property is managed in a financially responsible way, and that high standards of conservation are achieved.

Working Conditions: 

Property Managers normally work full-time.

Early starts, weekend work, late evenings and working public holidays may be required.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Salary will vary dependant on the employer and where people live. 

  • Salary can range from £23,000 – £26,000.

Use of a company vehicle may be available for some positions.

Skills: 
  • Consult and work with the local community
  • Produce site management plans
  • Identify problems with land use and develop recommendations to improve land use
  • Initiate enforcement procedures to protect the environment
  • Manage and deal with actual or potential breaches of the law or security
  • Lead the work of volunteers
  • Negotiate and secure sources of funding
  • Produce a business plan
  • Research and plan interpretations of landscapes, seascapes and habitats
  • Manage projects
  • Plan and conduct field surveys.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Work in a team/with others
  • Work on your own
  • Ability to communicate with people at different levels (employees to company executives)
  • Flexibility.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Environmental Conservation Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Environmental Conservation

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Environmental Conservation and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Employment and volunteering opportunities can be found in the following places:

Websites

* The Countryside Jobs Service can be viewed on-line, however it is recommended that you use the subscription service for a full list of employment opportunities.

Magazines and Journals

  • Environment Post
  • The Guardian (Wednesday).
Getting On: 

With experience and/or relevant qualifications it is possible to progress to manage larger estates or one with greater environmental, cultural or historic importance. The career structure will vary depending on the size of the organisation. Any progression is likely to involve moving to different parts of the country.

Further Information: 

More specialist advice, for example in relation to training, may be required for Senior Environmental Management roles and is available from:

Publications, Magazines and Journals:

Environmental Careers Handbook - Institute of Environmental Sciences (available from The Trotman Group, 2 The Green, Richmond, Surrey, TW9 1P11 Tel: 0870 900 2665 e-mail: mail@trotman.co.uk)

A to Z: 

Plant Pathologist

Also known as: 

Plant/Crop Researcher.

Job Description: 

A plant pathologist is someone who's interested in understanding the organisms and agents that cause plant diseases and how diseases affect plant health.

There are a massive range of plant pathology careers. Most plant pathologists work in university departments, commercial companies or do government funded research.

Some of the things a plant pathologist could do:

  • Diagnose and deal authoritatively with verbal and written enquiries on plant disease
  • Undertake relevant investigative research projects, publish the results in the appropriate journals and communicate the results to gardeners
  • Assist in the preparation of proposals for research projects
  • Liaise with relevant organisations and attend conferences, meetings etc. to promote and develop horticultural plant pathology, communicate research results and develop opportunities for collaboration
  • Assist in the preparation and presentation of lectures, examination materials and demonstrations on plant diseases.

Some of the things you may need:

  • A degree in a relevant biological subject, plus a higher degree or alternative relevant qualification in plant pathology or microbiology
  • Knowledge of horticulture and garden plants and their diseases
  • Research experience
  • Experience of advisory work with the public, including public speaking or lecturing
  • Experience in a plant clinic or in practical horticulture or agriculture.

Pathologists are mainly employed as researchers or consultants who work in a variety of fields aimed at tackling crop or garden pests and the insects and diseases that spread plant, human and animal diseases. Pathologists are also concerned with the conservation of our native flora & fauna and their habitats.

Most pathologists are employed by various public organisations, such as the research institutes, museums, universities and national and local government departments concerned with agriculture, horticulture, health, conservation and environmental protection.

In the private sector they are employed by agricultural estates, pest control contractors and companies that develop and manufacture biological and chemical insecticides, and by environmental consultants, County Wildlife Trusts and other environmental charities.

Working Conditions: 

Working hours will vary according to the exact nature of the job.

Plant Pathologists working in research and higher education usually work a standard full time week, Monday to Friday. Additional hours may be required at busy times. Those working in conservation may be required to host open days for the public or work with volunteers at weekends and bank holidays. They may also have to go to evening meetings.

Plant Pathologists can work all over the world and may have to cope with difficult climates. Fieldwork can be physically demanding.

A driving licence is often required to travel between different places of work.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries can be around £22,500 - £33,500
  • Senior positions around £34,500 - £37,500.

Salaries for people working in private industry will vary considerably.

Skills: 
  • Able to keep accurate records of research
  • Good communication skills to convey technical information to people with little or no scientific knowledge
  • Leadership skills
  • Research skills, the ability to analyse, interpret and report on data
  • Thorough knowledge of science, particularly biology and chemistry
  • Problem-solving ability.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Interest in science and plants
  • Interest in a particular sector where botany is important, such as conservation, teaching, research, food or pharmaceuticals
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • Methodical approach
  • Patience, perseverance and good concentration
  • Work well in a team and on his or her own initiative.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Horticulture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Horticulture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Horticulture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

For most Plant Pathologist jobs you will need a degree I a relevant subject as well as a higher degree, with some research experience.  Many jobs are offered on short-term contracts.

Employers include:

  • Universities
  • Private research organisations and institutes
  • Conservation organisations
  • Local authorities
  • Government agencies
  • Nature reserves and country parks
  • Botanical gardens and museums
  • Food and pharmaceutical companies.
Getting On: 

There is no established career structure for conservation and field research workers. Progression usually involves taking on more responsibility for projects and advising or managing others.

In universities, botanists may be promoted from researcher to lecturer, then to higher grades, such as senior lecturer, principal lecturer, reader, professor or head of department.

There may be an established career structure in industries, with experienced plant pathologist being promoted to more senior positions.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Jobs

A to Z: 

Pig Technician

Job Description: 

A Pig Technician will have skills in carrying out specialist services on the pig farm.

These may include applying treatments and vaccinations, detecting and identifying pigs on heat, artificial insemination of sows and gilts (female pigs) or putting female pigs to the boar, and pregnancy diagnosis through scanning.

Working Conditions: 

A Pig Technician generally would work as least 39 hours per week but it may be necessary to work overtime during busy periods.

The working conditions will depend on the farm. Some pigs are kept indoors all year, whereas other farms with drier land and soil keep their pigs outdoors in fields.

Some Farmers may do a mixture of both production systems depending on their soil conditions, farm location, and the breed and ages of pigs they keep.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and the employee’s skills and experience.

  • Experienced Pig Technicians may earn around £16,000 - £20,000 a year.

Pig Technicians may be given free or low-rent accommodation, or a lodging allowance. Overtime may also be available.

Skills: 
  • Deliver basic treatment to livestock
  • Enable livestock to initiate pregnancy
  • Manage livestock during gestation
  • Control and restrain animals
  • Move animals
  • Deliver artificial insemination to livestock
  • Advise on which sires to use.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Use own initiative
  • Safety awareness
  • Work in a team/with others
  • Work on your own
  • Flexibility
  • Mobility.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to enjoy working with pigs. Pig Technicians do not need any particular qualifications to enter the job and are likely to have been in the role of Basic Stockperson, Stockperson or Trainee and progressed to the role of Pig Technician.

It may be possible to enter this career through an appropriate Apprenticeship scheme.

Agricultural colleges run a range of relevant full-time courses that can be taken prior to starting work or whilst working.

The size of a farm has a direct relation to the number of specific roles and opportunities for employees to progress. There is competition for these vacancies, and movement from farm to farm to gain experience and promotion is usual.

Getting On: 

With the right qualifications and further experience, a Pig Technician can gain promotion to a Stockman, Section Head or Assistant (Unit) Manager. All agricultural workers need to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in their sector.

Increasingly, employees in agriculture participate in Continuing Professional Development (CPD) courses to enable them to enhance their skills, knowledge and careers. PIPR (Pig Industry Professional Register) aims to encourage people to better themselves and progress within the pig industry through Continued Professional Development (CPD). CPD Points are available in a variety of areas including:

  • Training Courses
  • Technical Meeting
  • Meetings with Vet/Consultants
  • Conferences
  • Trade Shows
  • Subscribing to industry journals, e.g. Pig World.

For those wishing to progress into farm management, a degree course in subjects such as agriculture or farm management may also be an option.

There may also be opportunities to work abroad.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found in the following websites and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • A Life on the Land
  • Scientific Farm Animal Production – Pearson Education
  • Farmers weekly
  • Farmers Guardian
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Pet Shop Manager

Also known as: 

Pet shop retail manager.

Job Description: 

Pet Shop Manager work in retail outlets caring for live animals and selling them as pets and companion animals. The Pet Shop Manager will have responsibility for the running of the business as well as supervising and managing others.

The most common pets on sale are fish (many outlets specialise only in fish) followed by small animals such as mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils and sometimes birds. A few stores offer more exotic pets such as snakes, lizards, large spiders and insects. Although cats and dogs are the most common household pets.

Pet stores also sell cages, aquaria, treatments, equipment, treats and accessories, as well as pet food. Some shops sell live food, such as locusts.

The work of a Pet Shop Manager may include:

  • Dealing with a range of customer enquiries about animal care, welfare and pet selection
  • Serving customers and taking payment for goods
  • Recruiting and selecting staff
  • Managing budgets.
Working Conditions: 

Full-time Pet Shop Managers usually work around 40 hours a week, sometimes including weekends and evenings.

 

They work in shops and other retail outlets. The work is mostly indoors, although coldwater fish, for example, can be kept outdoors. When working with a fish tank the hands and arms may be submerged in water for long periods. A protective apron or overall is often worn. A uniform is sometimes provided.

 

Pet Shop Managers spend a lot of time on their feet. The work may involve some heavy lifting and climbing up on stepladders.

The job could be unsuitable for those allergic to fur or feathers.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

The starting salary for a Pet Shop Manager may be around £24,500 - £30,000 a year.

Skills: 
  • Handle payments from clients
  • Assist in the sale of medicines and treatments for animals
  • Manage the maintenance of animal accommodation
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of animals
  • Price products and services
  • Interview and select candidates
  • Improve sales and marketing
  • Enhance performance through development of self, individuals and teams
  • Plan, supervise and control the movement of animals
  • Communicate information to customers
  • Maintaining stock levels.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Attention to detail
  • Good organisation skills.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Experience of working in a retail environment and with a wide range of animals will be useful. 

Most Pel Shop Managers will need to have qualifications to a minimum of level 3 although some may have progressed through the business gaining relevant training and qualifications.

There are apprenticeships available which will also provide a route into the career of a Pet Sop Manager.

Getting On: 

Pet Shop Managers may progress onto business owners or Retail Store Mangers where there are opportunities in large retail outlets.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • Pet Business World
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Fur and Feather
  • Cage And Aviary Birds Magazine
  • Koi Magazine
  • Parrots Magazine
  • Careers Working with Animals - Kogan Page
  • Grooming Manual for the Dog and Cat - Blackwell
  • Understanding Animal Welfare - Wiley Blackwell
  • So you want to work: with animals - Trotman
  • Real Life Guides: Working with animals and wildlife - Trotman
  • Practical Fish Keeping
  • Dog World
  • Dog Today
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Pet Shop Assistant

Also known as: 

Pet retail assistant

Job Description: 

Pet Retail Assistants work in retail outlets caring for live animals and selling them as pets and companion animals.

The most common pets on sale are fish (many outlets specialise only in fish) followed by small animals such as mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils and sometimes birds. A few stores offer more exotic pets such as snakes, lizards, large spiders and insects. Although cats and dogs are the most common household pets, only a small percentage of retail outlets actually sell puppies or kittens.

Pet stores also sell cages, aquaria, treatments, equipment, treats and accessories, as well as pet food. Some shops sell live food, such as locusts.

The work of a Pet Retail Assistant may include:

  • dealing with a range of customer enquiries about animal care, welfare and pet selection
  • keeping the store clean and tidy, and helping with unloading deliveries, shelf-filling and pricing
  • feeding and providing water to the animals cleaning out cages: changing substrate and bedding, removing faeces and other soiled material
  • cleaning out fish tanks: scraping algae off the sides, removing dead fish or plants, resetting new plants, siphoning off dirty water and refilling the tanks, changing filter material and unblocking tubes
  • checking the water temperature and chemical balance in fish tanks, including salt water tanks containing marine fish
  • catching one particular fish from a group in a tank and transferring it by net to a plastic bag or other receptacle
  • checking the fish and all of the other animals regularly for signs of disease and, if necessary, take them to a veterinary surgeon
  • catching and handling birds and animals in the correct way and transferring them to carrying boxes (they move very quickly and may bite if frightened)
  • exercising and grooming animals if necessary
  • serving customers and taking payment for goods
Working Conditions: 

Full-time Pet Retail Assistants usually work around 39 hours a week, sometimes including weekends and evenings. Many Pet Retail Assistants work part-time.

They work in shops and other retail outlets. The work is mostly indoors, although coldwater fish, for example, can be kept outdoors. When working with a fish tank the hands and arms may be submerged for long periods. A protective apron or overall is often worn. A uniform is sometimes provided.

Pet Retail Assistants spend a lot of time on their feet. The work may involve some heavy lifting and climbing up on stepladders.

The job could be unsuitable for those allergic to fur or feathers.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • the starting salary for a Pet Retail Assistant may be around £11,500 a year
  • an experienced Assistant may earn up to £12,500, or more
  • Assistant Managers of pet shops may earn £16,500 a year, or more
Skills: 
  • Handle payments from clients
  • Assist in the sale of medicines and treatments for animals
  • Provide exercise opportunities for animals
  • Groom animals
  • Assist with maintaining animal accommodation
  • Handle animals
  • Provide feed and water to animals
  • Deliver basic treatments to animals under supervision
  • Unload animals and establish them in their new environment
  • Restrain animals
Personal Qualities: 
  • Team player
  • Conscientious
  • Reliable
  • Good communication skills
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

In the UK there are some 3,200 pet shops. Pet Retail Assistants work in shops on the High Street or in shopping malls, in pet departments within garden centres and in pet superstores. Many retailers are based in towns and cities, or large out-of-town shopping centres. Jobs are available throughout the UK.

Pet ownership is growing and working with animals is a popular choice, so there can be competition for vacancies. However, there is a demand for trained assistants in the growth area of retailing aquatic plants and fish.

No formal academic qualifications are required to work as a Pet Retail Assistant. However, many employers expect applicants to have either paid or unpaid experience in caring for animals. It may therefore be beneficial to gain experience through volunteering.

It may also be possible to enter this career through an Apprenticeship scheme.

Large retailers may advertise jobs on their own websites. Vacancies may be advertised in local newspapers.

Getting On: 

Promotion to supervisory and then managerial roles may be possible. Opportunities for progression may be greater in larger organisations.

Courses relevant to getting into a managerial role include the NPTC Level 3 Advanced Certificate in Pet Store Management. This is available at some colleges, or from the Pet Care Trust which offers a distance learning course.

Some, particularly those who have studied to the level of HNC, HND or degree in areas such as animal care, animal welfare or animal behaviour, may move into specialised areas of working with animals.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Publications, Magazines and Journals (Some may be priced):

  • Pet Business World
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Fur and Feather
  • Cage And Aviary Birds Magazine
  • Koi Magazine
  • Parrots Magazine
  • Careers Working with Animals - Kogan Page
  • Grooming Manual for the Dog and Cat - Blackwell
  • Understanding Animal Welfare - Wiley Blackwell
  • So you want to work: with animals - Trotman
  • Real Life Guides: Working with animals and wildlife - Trotman
  • Practical Fish Keeping
  • Dog World
  • Dog Today
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Parts/Stores Person

Also known as: 

Parts man or junior/senior parts person.

Job Description: 

You may be entering the industry as trainee parts person you will progress to being a Parts Person after gaining experience and skills whilst working under supervision. You will work in stores with full time parts people and carry out some low level jobs whilst learning.

A Parts Person supports the Sales and Service Departments with the supply of resources or parts.

The job involves using computers and often paper manuals. It is beneficial to have a good understanding of engineering parts and some sales and marketing skills, however, training is given. A Parts Person manages stock control and purchasing products for sale

The role involves working with workshop technicians, the sales team and end users/customers. 

Working Conditions: 

A Parts Person will be mainly based on site in the particular store. Normal working hours are 37.5 hours per week but as the industry is seasonal can involve out of hours and weekend work. 

Protective clothing is needed, such as overalls and boots.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay as salary levels vary widely depending on experience and on the employing organisation. 

  • Trainees can expect to earn between £12,000- 15,000
  • Trained Parts Persons will earn between £15,000- 25,000.
Skills: 
  • Be able to maintain supplies of resources
  • Preparing proposals and quotations for the supply of products and services
  • Liaising with manufactures on land-based machinery technical issues
  • Presenting proposals and quotations for the supply of products and services
  • Displaying stock to promote sales to customers in a retail environment
  • Solving generic customer problems
  • Storing resources for further use
  • Processing of customer orders
  • Marketing and selling the organisation's products and services.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to work on own or as part of a team
  • Able to use initiative.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Land-Based Engineering Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Land-Based Engineering

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Land-Based Engineering and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are two routes for people to enter the industry either through an Apprenticeship or and Industry Apprenticeship with a dealer/manufacturer. 

Entry requirements vary but most employers expect 4 GCSEs (A-C) or equivalent, including Maths, English and Science or Technology along with ICT skills. 

Having a clean full driving licence will also improve employment opportunities.

Getting On: 

From this role you can progress to Senior Parts Person or Stores Manager or go into Sales. A Parts Person can also progress and move into other parts of the business, such as sales and marketing.

The Land-based Technician Accreditation (LTA) programme sets out a recognised career path which is related to pay scales. 

Further information can be found on the Institution of Agricultural Engineers (IAgrE) web site which also provides information and support on the routes to professional registration. 

Further Information: 

Additional information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publication

A World of Opportunity (Careertrack).

A to Z: 

Parts/Stores Manager

Job Description: 

The parts managers’ role is very important part of the business. The role includes managing the parts department budget in term of stock, (parts kept on the shelf in store and promotional stock in the shop which may include tools, spare parts and toys).

You will also be responsible for staff involved with the parts department, apprentices, trainees, qualified parts people and senior parts staff.

Parts managers will be required to work with directors or owners of the business to discuss business plans, targets and stocking rates and levels.

Working closely with repair workshops making sure there is good communication between departments when dealing with customer requirements for parts when machines  break down and for machines owned by business which is being made ready for sale.

One of the most important parts of any agricultural dealership is the parts department in terms of profitability.

Parts are sold to the business to repair to new and second hand goods being made ready for sale and to supply customers who need replacement parts for existing machines and sundries such as draw bar pins, spring clips, hydraulic couplings, tolls etc. Therefore the parts department is a very busy and extensive department in terms of turnover and profit.

Keeping the cost down is an important part of the parts managers role.

Managing the flow of stock is paramount to the success of the business. Therefore stock on the shelves need to be turned over as quick as possible, all stock needs to be accounted for and charged out where possible.

Working Conditions: 

Parts/Stores Managers working within a multi branch business may need to travel to all branches to make sure targets and stock control is being managed correctly and meeting agreed target levels.

The parts department is the heart of the dealership business, so working with sales and service management team is an important part of the day to day activity in terms of meeting the needs of each departments’ requirements for spare parts service.

Attending monthly management meetings and carrying out staff appraisals is an important part of the role.

Parts/Stores Managers are responsible for making sure that the stores team work with internal customer (service department and sales team) in all areas of activity. 

A key function of their role is the ordering and supply of products and services to ensure that all customer’s needs for spare parts and products are met on time at the agreed cost.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Salary levels vary widely depending on experience and on the employing organisation. 

  • Parts/Stores Managers can expect to earn between £35,000-45,000.
Skills: 
  • Managing budgets
  • Managing resources including stock and staff
  • Identify and plan development of staff
  • Liaise with and interpret customer requirements
  • Be able to provide technical support
  • Liaise with manufacturers.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication
  • Able to use initiative
  • Problem solving.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Land-Based Engineering Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Land-Based Engineering

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Land-Based Engineering and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are two routes for people to enter the industry either through an Apprenticeship or and Industry Apprenticeship with a dealer/manufacturer. 

Entry requirements vary but most employers expect 4 GCSEs (A-C) or equivalent, including Maths, English and Science or Technology along with ICT skills. 

A Parts/Stores Manger is likely to have progressed from a parts/stores person and have experience within the trade or associated industry or through working experience in workshops or in Sales.

Having a clean full driving licence will also improve employment opportunities. 

Getting On: 

Most opportunities will come from working for all sizes of business, but progress to a Sales Manager or Branch Manager may be possible with further training and experience.

Further Information: 

For further information on careers in the sector you can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publication

A World of Opportunity (Careertrack).

A to Z: 

Herdsperson

Job Description: 

A Herdsperson is responsible for the livestock on a farm. This will include ensuring they are fed and watered and looked after to meet health and welfare requirements as well as growth targets. They may also have some responsibility for staff working on the farm.

 

A livestock farm may have a range of cattle at different ages on the farm. Some farms keep and rear their own replacement animals, whereas other buy animals in to replace those which have reached the end of their production period. 

 

Some farms rear animals for meat and these are fed specific diets to enable them to grow until they reach the correct weight and fatness when they are sold through livestock markets and abattoirs.

Many farmers take pride in producing a quality animal to high welfare standards to go into the food chain and a good Herdsperson is key to achieving this. A Herdsperson would be responsible for:

 

  • Feeding correct diet rations to the cattle
  • Monitoring their health and condition and reporting any problems
  • Weighing the cattle to monitor performance
  • Moving cattle to different fields and buildings
  • Ensuring cattle are tagged and identified correctly.
Working Conditions: 

A Herdsperson generally works as least 39 hours per week but it may be necessary to work paid overtime during busy periods. Early mornings, evenings and weekend work can be necessary, for example during the calving or lambing season to ensure help is at hand with any difficulties during birth.

 

The working conditions will depend on the farm. Some livestock are kept indoors and fed on silage, straw, or hay with grain, whereas other farms leave the livestock to graze on grass outside for most of the year, bringing them in for the winter months.

 

Many farmers do a mixture of both production systems depending on their grass growth, soil conditions, location and cattle breeds. A Herdsperson would be expected to work both outside and in livestock buildings.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These salaries can vary according to the responsibility. Individual employers may pay more according to the Herdsperson’s skills and experience.

 

  • Starting salaries for a Herdsperson are at least £16,000- £18,000 a year
  • With experience, a Herdsperson may earn up to £25,000- £30,000 a year.
 

Many Herdspersons will be provided with rent-free accommodation and a vehicle. There may also be other benefits such as free farm produce and a pension scheme and a vehicle.

Skills: 
  • Control the movement of livestock from one location to another
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of Livestock
  • Monitor the provision of feed and water to Livestock
  • Enable livestock to initiate pregnancy
  • Monitor and maintain livestock on outdoor sites
  • Manage forage production to support livestock
  • Manage grassland to support livestock
  • Manage grazing of livestock
  • Plan and implement breeding programme
  • Plan and manage health plans.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Problem-solving
  • Work in a team/with others
  • Work on your own
  • Self-motivated
  • Flexible.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to enjoy work outdoors and working with livestock. To progress to a Herdsperson you may have started as a General Farm Worker or basic stock person gaining experience in working with livestock and undertaken further training.

 

A Herdsperson will need to have an interest in farming and in using agricultural machinery. Experience of working on a farm, either through work experience or a weekend or holiday job is valued by employers. 

 

It may be possible to enter this career through an appropriate Apprenticeship scheme.

On large farms there are likely to be specific Herdsperson vacancies. On smaller mixed farms, a Herdsperson is likely to be involved in other farm enterprises such as arable crops.

Getting On: 

With the right qualifications and experience, a Herdsperson can gain promotion to a Unit Manager on a large farm, or expand their skills to work across a range of businesses on the farm as a General Farm Manager.

 

For those wishing to progress into farm management, a degree in subjects such as agriculture and animal or farm management may be an option.

There may also be opportunities to work abroad.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • A Life on the Land
  • Scientific Farm Animal Production – Pearson Education
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Farmers Guardian
  • Dairy Farmer
  • Beef Farmer
  • Sheep Farmer
  • Poultry Farmer
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Riding Instructor/Coach

Also known as: 

Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach; Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach; Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach; or Level 4 Coach.

Job Description: 

They will work with riders of all ages, levels of ability and experience ranging form the complete beginner to the more experienced competitors dependent on your own abilities. 

The Instructor/Coach will plan, deliver and review safe and competent lessons.  Each level of instructor will be competent to work with different levels of students as follows:

  • Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach will support senior qualified coaches and instructors to teach students
  • Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach will run coaching sessions for riders from beginners to Novice level, lunging of horse and rider to show improvement, and jumping to Stage 2 Level.
  • Intermediate Instructor/level 3 Coach should be able to show genuine improvement of horse and rider, demonstrate sound practical business knowledge and be conversant with running a commercial yard.
  • Instructor/Level 4 Coach is qualified to teach riders up to the level of Advanced Medium Dressage, Intermediate Horse Trials and Foxhunter level show jumping.

Planning, conducting and reviewing coaching sessions is common at all levels of coaching.  The different levels of Instructor/Coach will be trained to coach in their specialist area and will prepare, deliver and review sessions in activities such as Dressage, Showjumping, Eventing, Horseball, Reining, Endurance, Driving, Riding for the Disabled, Vaulting, Polo cross and Western. For more information go to www.bef.co.uk.

The role is varied at the different levels but you will need to be able to:

 

Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach

At this level you would be expected to:

  • Assist other instructors/coaches with lessons
  • Check the correct tack is being used
  • Assist riders where necessary
  • Lead novice riders. 

Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach

At this level you would be expected to also:

  • Work with individuals or groups who want to ride for leisure, prepare for competitions or achieve equestrian qualifications
  • Provide practical demonstrations to support others
  • Teach classroom theory sessions to support others.

Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach

At this level you would be expected to also be able to:

  • Work with individuals or groups who want to ride for leisure, prepare for competitions or achieve equestrian qualifications
  • Provide practical demonstrations to support others
  • Teach classroom theory sessions to support others
  • Attend events and be a role model at county/regional level
  • Prepare, deliver and evaluating annual programmes for rider development
  • Supervise others, such as Trainee Instructors/Level 1 Coach and Assistant Instructors/Level 2 Coach
  • Train horses, riding and schooling them from the ground. 

Instructor/Level 4 Coach

At this level you would be expected to also be able to:

  • Manage and assess staff/trainees
  • Show that you are competent and confident in all aspects of horse care and management
  • Undertake practical handling skills
  • Offer sound theoretical knowledge to other coaches/instructors
  • Manage the business aspects of an equestrian establishment
  • Train a variety of horses using sound training principles both on the flat and over fences
  • Work with horses on the ground
  • Actively compete horses in affiliated competitions. 
Working Conditions: 

An Instructor/Coach will have vast knowledge and skills of handling and riding horses.  They will also have lots of experience in different aspects of equine theory and management.  The hours of work may vary but usually will include evenings and weekends. The work can also be seasonal depending on the place of work.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from towns; sometimes in quite remote areas.  Therefore a driving licence may be useful.  Due to location some instructors work away from home or live in at the riding school.

The work can take place outside on grass, all weather arenas or in indoor arenas. 

An Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach should be smartly dressed the usual attire includes; jodhpurs, riding boots/half chaps, and suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat. 

There is a risk of injury when working around horses as they may bite, kick or stand on your feet. 

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live and your level of competence.

  • Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach may be paid a basic wage with training and lessons they may also be on an apprentice programme. All employed apprentices must receive the appropriate national minimum wage (£2.65 for under 19 and first year apprentices, £4.68 for 19 and 20 year olds and £6.19 for those aged 21 and over).
  • Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach may earn £12-£20 per hour freelance or £12,000 to £17,000 a year in employment. A more experienced, successful, Assistant Instructor/ Level 2 Coach who is a well known competitor in their chosen discipline, may earn £20 - £30 per hour
  • Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach may earn £15 - £25 per hour freelance or £14,000 - £20,000 a year in employment.  A more experienced, successful, Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach who is a well known competitor in their chosen discipline, may earn £25 - £35 per hour
  • Instructor/Level 4 Coach may earn £20-30 per hour freelance or £18,000 to £25,000 a year in employment.  A more experienced, successful, Instructor/ Level 4 Coach who is a well known competitor in their chosen discipline, may earn £30 - £40 per hour
  • The rate of pay in employment depends on the size of the employer’s establishment, experience and whether accommodation, meals and further training is included.

Freelance earnings would depend on experience, success in attracting business and the number of hours worked

Skills: 
  • Carry out stable yard duties
  • Complete any administration required at your level of competence
  • Establish and maintain good customer service and working relationships with others
  • Monitor personal skills for instructing/coaching practice
  • Ensure that all coaching is carried out safely, fairly and in a suitable environment
  • Provide classroom and stable management lectures
  • Advise on safe and appropriate clothing and conduct
  • Prepare and deliver theory and practical lessons for individuals or groups at different levels of your own competence
  • Assess riders at your own level of competence
  • Give practical demonstrations to others.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a real desire to help people improve
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Good communication skills
  • Able  to work in a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Although there are different ways to enter the industry you may enter this role being a groom within a stable and progress to Instructor after gaining experience and qualifications. 

There are opportunities to gain employment as a trainee instructor/Level 1 Coach, Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach or apprentice within a range or riding establishments. 

These could be members of Association of British Riding Schools (ABRS). The British Horse Society (BHS) riding schools have to be registered with the local authority but do not have to be members of any organisation. Riding schools can range in size from those with only one instructor to those employing a dozen or more.

Other routes to becoming an Instructor include; college, through competing in a specific discipline such as show jumping or dressage and training with the affiliate body.

Getting On: 

A fully qualified Instructor/Coach could progress to become a Senior Instructor/Coach at a riding school, freelance or within their chosen discipline.

There may also be opportunities to work abroad and qualified Instructor/Coaches can apply for an International Equestrian Trainers Passport which is recognised in 32 countries.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • The Riding Instructor’s Handbook – BHS
  • Coaching Skills for Riding Teachers
  • The Principles of Teaching Riding - ABRS
  • Magazines/journals:
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Horse and Rider.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Riding Centre Manager

Also known as: 

Equine Tourism Manger; Horse Riding Holiday Centre Manager; Trekking Centre Manager.

Job Description: 

Riding Centre Managers oversee the running of horse riding centres that offer riding and trekking holidays.  Some Riding Centre Managers also own the riding and trekking establishments.

Riding Centre Managers are also responsible for the organisation, operation and marketing of the centre, and for supervising the care of the horses.

An Riding Centre Manager job varies depending on the employer but the main tasks include:

  • Balance the organisation of the riding centre and welfare and care of the animals with the marketing and operation of a holiday centre
  • Liaise with local tour operators to enhance business opportunities
  • Ordering of all supplies including horse food, supplements etc.
  • Ensuring that the business meets health and safety requirements
  • Planning and organising all business aspects of the centre, including marketing, administration, customer care, finances and insurances
  • Overseeing the management of the horses and ensuring the treks are suitably planned
  • Arranging daily routines for horse care and stable management
  • Handling queries, problems and complaints
  • Recruiting and managing staff, organising work rotas and arranging training.
Working Conditions: 

Riding Centre Managers usually work long hours that include evenings and weekends. The hours of work depend on the type and size of the centre. Riding Centre Managers spend some time working indoors in an office but also work outdoors in all weather conditions.

Trekking centres are situated throughout the UK but are more common in rural parts of the country, such as the National Parks of Dartmoor, Exmoor and the Lake District, and in coastal areas that are popular with tourists.

Before working with children, applicants must undergo checks through the Criminal Records Bureau.

There is a risk of injury when working around horses as they may bite, kick or stand on your feet so it important to ensure you are protected therefore all personnel working with equines should wear suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including riding boots, waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat when exercising or riding.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

There figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries are usually around £16,000 per year
  • Experienced Riding Centre Managers can earn around £20,000 per year.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Leadership and decision making
  • A good riding ability
  • Thorough knowledge and understanding of stable management
  • Customer-care
  • Business administration and management skills and or qualifications
  • Sound knowledge of horse breeds which are suitable for recreational riding
  • Maintain your own and others health and safety and appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) required for the work
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare legislations and codes of practice
  • Knowledge, experience and training in equestrian work.
  • Maintenance of grasslands for equines
  • Map reading skills for planning and taking rides.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communications skills
  • Genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Flexible with regards to working hours and location
  • Self motivated
  • Willing to undertake routine and practical tasks.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

People usually start in related jobs, such as an Assistant Ride Leader, Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach or Groom, and work their way up to a management role.

Academic qualifications are often required as well as a real interest and enthusiasm for working with horses. 

If you are working in the equestrian tourism industry, you can complete equestrian tourism qualifications. These are especially suitable if you take out treks, trail rides or hacks (for more experienced riders).

Getting On: 

Riding Centre Managers may also have the opportunity to expand their skills and qualifications.  This would depend on the size and type of equestrian establishment they work in.

Other roles could include:

  • Equine Tourism Examiner
  • Instructor/Coach
  • Yard Manager
  • Horse Transporter
  • Business Yard Manager. 
Further Information: 

Additional information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Your Horse
  • Horse and Rider.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

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