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Ranger

Job Description: 

Rangers manage areas of countryside such as woods, wetlands, common land and National Parks. The main focus is on environmental conservation, wildlife management, education, advice, access and maintenance.

Rangers consider themselves part of a national service despite working for a range of employees in different environments. Environmental education is at the core of their work to support the conservation of landscapes within which they operate.

Rangers require a deep-seated interest in the natural environment, an ability to work both alone and as part of team as well as the capacity to work well and engage with the general public.

Tasks include:

  • Patrolling to assist visitors
  • Taking part in a variety of environmental projects
  • Providing information to visitors
  • Delivering educational talks to groups as well as administration and management related to maintenance
  • Health and safety
  • Pest control
  • Land-owner liaison. 

There is scope for specialisation as a career develops.

In the UK there are many employers, from both public and private sectors, who employ countryside rangers or officers. Rangers have been active since the 1950s throughout Scotland with the role now widespread throughout all landscapes and environments.

A variety of organisations employ rangers with key employers such as National Parks, Forestry Commission, local authorities and the National Trust providing the bulk of opportunities.

Working Conditions: 

Rangers operate mainly outdoors in all weather conditions although a number of functions take place in an office or visitor centre. Facilities may operate seven days a week at all times of the year with the intensity and timing of work related to the visitor seasons.In larger countryside organisations, rangers are likely to work on a rota system with other members of staff, including early mornings, evenings and weekends. Rangers should be fit and prepared to do a good deal of walking.There may be opportunities for both full-time and part-time working with the norm for full-time being a 37 hour week.The work is an essential part of land management and conservation, benefiting both lowland and upland landscape sites as well as other habitats. Candidates need to be comfortable working alone in remote locations.The work itself is varied and demands flexibility, diligence and enthusiasm for education and conservation. Rangers combine excellent local knowledge and the skills of an experienced manager with a deep understanding of the countryside and a willingness to develop and communicate those skills.A full driving licence is desirable and usually essential. Individuals must be motivated, adaptable and approachable.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

A Countryside Ranger might expect to have a salary of around £18,000 to £25,000 with a Head Ranger earning in excess of £30,000 per annum. These figures are only a guide, actual rates of pay may vary considerably depending on the employer and where people live and work.

Similarly variations occur according to the employer and on occasion, if the position comes with accommodation. Some countryside locations are remote and isolated with limited housing in the vicinity.

Skills: 
  • Manage habitats such as woods, wetlands, parks
  • Communicate with others
  • Work and liaise with local communities and agencies
  • Manage budgets
  • Plan and maintain resources
  • Monitor pest and predator populations
  • Stalk and cull deer
  • Maintain and improve game and wildlife habitats.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills 
  • Able to work in teams and on own
  • Able to use initiative
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Able to prioritise work.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Game and Wildlife Management Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Game and Wildlife Management

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Game and Wildlife Management and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to:

  • Have an enthusiasm and interest in natural heritage, conservation, education and countryside habitats.
  • Enjoy working mainly outdoors carrying out a variety of tasks
  • Have a capacity to engage positively with the general public.

Work experience on a countryside site is very useful not only as an introduction to ranger work but also for gaining a position as a trainee ranger. There is a variety of routes to gaining a position and it is possible to work up through an organisation by gaining experience and taking educational courses. Nonetheless many candidates come to the service having undertaken full-time study in subjects such as Environmental management, Geography, Ecology and Conservation.

Ranger positions are usually advertised in local press or via the internet on the websites of key employers so this could be a good place to start your job search.

Getting On: 

If you are conscientious, dedicated and demonstrate an affinity for the countryside there may be opportunities for promotion to a more senior position, especially if you work for one of the bigger organisations. 

If you are with a smaller organisation working as a Ranger, you may have to move to find a promoted position such as Head Ranger. This position involves managing all aspects of the countryside management programme including project planning, budget control and land owner liaison.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (Some may be priced):

  • Ranger Magazine
  • Countryside Magazine

Jobs

A to Z: 

Stud Manager

Job Description: 

Stud Managers are employed by equestrian business owners to make sure the yard runs efficiently. A Stud Manager is responsible for the day to day running of the yard including managing staff, care of the horses, all aspects of health and safety and dealing with clients.

As a Stud Manager, you could work on various types of yards, such as competition, breeding, training, riding schools, racing and trekking. Your work would depend partly on the type and size of the yard but you may be required to:

  • Plan the running of the equestrian yard
  • Plan the horses’ exercise routine
  • Plan horses’ routine care and keep appropriate records for vaccinations, farrier, teeth and worming
  • Purchase and maintenance of feed and equipment
  • Keep appropriate records such as financial, insurance, accident reporting
  • Conduct risk assessments
  • Maintenance of grassland
  • Select, purchase and sell horses
  • Recruit, train and supervise staff.

On smaller equestrian establishments, you may have sole charge of a yard and do more practical work, such as looking after the horses, riding horses and yard maintenance.

In competition, hunting or racing yards, Yard Managers may also prepare horses for events and may accompany them. In smaller studs and breeding yards, duties may also include working with stallions, mares and foals, assisting with foaling and handling young stock.

Depending on your skills and qualifications, you may also have responsibility for other activities, for example running competitions, instructing, transporting horses, promoting and marketing the establishment and liaising with owners/clients.

Working Conditions: 

Stud Managers work around 40 hours a week but may work longer on occasions. Early mornings, late nights and weekend working is common practice for Stud Managers. Work can involve lifting, carrying, bending, climbing and standing for long periods.

As a Stud Manager work is mainly outdoors, in all weather conditions. You would wear suitable footwear and outdoor wear and when handling horses and a hard hat, riding boots and preferably a body protector when riding. There is a risk of injury if a horse bites or kicks you or you fall off.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from towns; sometimes in quite remote areas. Therefore a driving licence may be useful.

Due to location and the nature of the job role, some positions are live-in where, with overall responsibility of the Yard, you may be on call to respond to any emergencies or issues on the yard.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Salaries for Stud Managers may be around £14,000 - £20,000 a year.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees; horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Care for visitors
  • Purchase products or services for the land-based organisation
  • Establish hygiene and biosecurity arrangements
  • Ensure a healthy and safe workplace
  • Define and meet personnel requirements
  • Establish and implement a horse care policy
  • Inspect horses for specific requirements
  • Establish critical pre-inspection requirements
  • Establish basic training
  • Control and organise the breeding of horses
  • Establish and implement a breeding policy
  • Control and organise the rearing of young stock
  • Control and organise foaling and care of the foal
  • Oversee the sales preparation procedures.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Good communications skills
  • Good organisation skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Self-motivated
  • Have the ability to work alone and also as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To become a Stud Manager it is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest, knowledge and experience of working with horses and their welfare
  • Enjoy working outdoors
  • Have good organisational and leadership skills.

Stud Managers work throughout the UK and abroad. Employers include riding schools, private stables, competition yards, college equine units, polo yards, livery stables, producers, stud yards, hunting yards, trekking centres, horse rehabilitation centres and the Armed Forces.

Job opportunities for Stud Managers are reasonably good. However, to improve employment opportunities it is recommended that you gain experience working on a yard as a Groom or Yard Assistant for a number of years to:

  • Improve your skills and experience of working with horses.
  • Meet other potential employers
  • Gain relevant qualifications
  • Confirm if you would like to continue to work in this environment.
Getting On: 

With experience and relevant qualifications it is possible to further develop your skills in a number of directions.This may provide you with more responsibilities with an existing employer depending on the size of the organisation. It may be necessary to seek opportunities with an alternative employer in order to progress.

Experienced Stud Managers may also become:

  • Instructor/Coach
  • HGV Driver
  • Rider
  • Event Co-ordinator
  • Trainer (Racing)
  • Stud Manager
  • Business Manager.

Stud Managers wanting to also become riding instructors can take BHS or ABRS teaching qualifications.

There are opportunities to work and train abroad.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Your Horse
  • Horse and Rider
  • Horse and Pony.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Stud Hand

Also known as: 

Stud Groom; Assistant Stud Groom.

Job Description: 

A Stud Hand will be responsible for the care of several mares. Duties include general handling of mares and foals. This involves turning them out, fetching them in, holding them for teasing, covering, veterinary inspection, farriery and presenting them to owners and clients. Stud staff may be required to work at the bloodstock sales after the breeding season (source: Northern Racing College). 

Working Conditions: 

Stud-hands will work around 40 hours a week, but may work longer on occasions. There may be early mornings, late nights and weekend working. Part-time, seasonal and casual work is often available. Most of the work is outdoors, in all weather conditions. Work can involve lifting, carrying, bending, climbing and standing for long periods. Stables can be dusty.

There is a risk of injury if a horse bites or kicks you or you fall off. Stables can be a long way from towns; sometimes in quite remote areas therefore a driving licence may be useful.

Some jobs involve travelling and staying away from home.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account. 

Skills: 
  • Maintain the health and well-being of equines
  • Maintain harness and saddles
  • Groom and clean a horse
  • Maintain your own health and safety and appropriate personal protective equipment required for this work
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare and health and safety legislation/codes of practice
  • Preparing horses for shows, racing or transport
  • Maintain records
  • Able to recognise signs of equine illnesses.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare 
  • Good communications skills
  • Good organisation skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Self-motivated
  • Have the ability to work alone and also as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To become a Stud Hand it is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Enjoy working outdoors
  • Like working with people.

To improve employment opportunities it is recommended that volunteering or taking seasonal/temporary work are considered so as to provide potential entrants with an opportunity to:

  • Gain experience (confirming expectations/ensuring it is what they want to do)
  • Gain some of the skill requirements
  • Show the employer what they can do
  • Show the employer that they have a desire to work in the industry
  • Network with other potential employers.
Getting On: 

With experience and relevant qualifications it is possible to progress to management or more senior positions.

The career structure will vary depending on the size of the organisation. It may be necessary to seek opportunities with an alternative employer in order to progress.

Experienced Stud Hands may become:

  • A Stud Manager.

There are also opportunities to work and train abroad.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • Horse and Hounds
  • British Horse
  • Horse and Pony
  • Horse and Rider
  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Stalker

Job Description: 

Stalking is a highly skilled job often working alone in wild and remote landscapes. Focusing on all aspects of successful wild deer management, a stalker contributes to the efficient culling of deer, for example on countryside estates, and the conservation and management of the natural habitat.

There can be a requirement to work closely with neighbouring estate stalkers to ensure an efficient, co-ordinated cull throughout the landscape.

On occasion, particularly during the stag stalking season, a stalker will take responsibility for small numbers of shooting guests. Stalkers are likely to undertake a range of other tasks including pest and predator control, maintenance, part-time shepherding etc. This will particularly be the case on upland red deer estates owing to the relatively short season. Tasks are largely outdoors and often undertaken in quite harsh weather conditions.

In the UK there are in excess of 14,000 active deer stalkers with the number being higher if you include those involved in recreational stalking.

Culling deer begins with shooting stags in the late summer to the end of the autumn. Red deer hinds are shot throughout the winter months. Roe deer are managed throughout the year.

Full-time employment opportunities on rural estates will often be in very remote upland locations such as the Northwest Highlands of Scotland, although stalkers are employed throughout the UK on low ground estates as well as on farms and woodlands.

Working Conditions: 

Shooting estates operate seven days a week at all times of the year. The intensity and timing of work is related to the deer-stalking season. Therefore stalkers on estates usually work flexible hours based around the jobs that need completing at different times of the year.

In larger estates, they are likely to work on a rota system with other members of staff including early mornings, evenings and weekends. Roe buck stalking for example involves particularly anti-social hours in the late evening and again from 3.30am in the morning. There may be opportunities for both full-time and part-time working.

The work is an essential part of land management and conservation, benefiting moorland, woodland, farmland and other habitats. Candidates need to be comfortable working alone in remote locations. Most of their working time is spent outdoors in all weather conditions. The work itself is active and physical, demanding patience, perseverance and skill over long hours.

Stalkers combine excellent local knowledge, the skills of an experienced hill walker with a deep understanding of the deer. A full driving licence is usually desirable and sometimes essential. Stalkers would be expected to hold both a Shotgun Certificate and a Firearms Certificate.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

A stalker might expect to have a salary of around £15,000, with a Junior or Under stalker earning less and the Head stalker commanding an annual salary of between £18,000 to £20,000.

These figures are only a guide, actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live and work. Similarly variations occur according to the employer and whether the position comes with accommodation, a vehicle or allowances for clothing, firearms etc.

Many estates are remote and isolated with limited housing in the vicinity.

Skills: 
  • Promote good standards of health and safety
  • Stalking and culling deer
  • Transport and inspect dead deer
  • Prepare for heather burning
  • Manage game populations
  • Maintain stocks of game birds
  • Maintain habitats on estates.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Able to plan workloads
  • Flexible and adaptable.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Game and Wildlife Management Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Game and Wildlife Management

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Game and Wildlife Management and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to:

  • Have an enthusiasm and interest in deer, conservation and remote wild landscapes
  • Enjoy working mainly outdoors carrying out a variety of tasks
  • Have due care for the environment in which wild deer management takes place.

Work experience on an estate is very useful as an introduction to stalking and consequently, following various courses, gaining a position as an Under Stalker.

Stalking positions are usually advertised in local press or in trade publications such as Shooting Times, hard copy or online, so this could be a good place to start your job search. Word-of-mouth recommendations and written references are important to find employment.

Getting On: 

If you are conscientious, willing to turn up on time and at weekends and show yourself to be a committed employee, there may be an opportunity for promotion to a more senior position, especially if you work for one of the bigger Estates. 

If you are working as a stalker with a smaller organisation, you may have to move to find a promoted position such as Head Stalker. This position involves managing all aspects of the deer programme including weapon safety, deer shooting, habitat conservation, resources, people, security etc. 

Further Information: 

For further support and information on careers in the Game and Wildlife industry you can contact the Lantra Connect Service:

Tel: 0845 707 8007 or e-mail connect@lantra.co.uk

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (Some may be priced):

  • Modern Gamekeeping magazine
  • Shooting Times

Jobs

Wildlife jobs

A to Z: 

Head Gardener / Head Grounds Maintenance Worker

Also known as: 

Head Park Ranger; Team Leader/Foreman; Senior Gardener; Machine Plant Supervisor; Parks Officer; Curator.

Job Description: 

The UK has more than 30,000 public parks managed by local authorities, many with world wide recognition. These parks, many designed in Victorian times, now meet many demands of the surrounding communities and are becoming more important in meeting the challenges of climate change, air pollution, public health conditions and community inclusion, to name but a few.

Head Gardeners/Head Grounds Maintenance Worker generally works for local councils and private companies managing parks, open and green spaces. They work to maintain and develop public parks and open spaces for the benefit of local residents and visitors.

They supervise and allocate work to teams of gardeners and landscaping staff. This job role gives the opportunity for plenty of ‘hands on’ work as well as opportunities for those who wish to get into the managerial side of park and green space management.

Their main tasks are usually to:

  • Organise the maintenance of parks and open spaces, for example mowing grass, re-turfing, adding fertiliser and weeding
  • Plan landscaping and planting of flowers, shrubs and trees
  • Organise planting programmes at appropriate times of year
  • Arrange areas and facilities designated for sports and recreation purposes
  • Engage and work with community and volunteer groups
  • Organise and plan events in parks
  • Ensure environmental and conservation requirements are optimised.

Much of their time is spent checking on the progress and quality of maintenance and planting programmes. Their teams can vary from two or three people to around 20 people, according to the number of sites and the areas covered.

Head Gardener/Head Grounds Maintenance Workers also:

  • Ensure vehicles and equipment used by their teams are maintained in good and safe condition
  • Plan ahead to ensure equipment, materials and human resources  are available at the appropriate times of year
  • Work with other members of staff such as ground maintenance staff or landscape architects to regenerate and/or develop horticultural features, such as plant beds
  • Establish the future needs of parks and open spaces by consulting with park users and members of the local community
  • Ensure all health and safety guidelines are followed monitoring the safety and condition of features and facilities, such as play areas
  • Discuss policy matters and write reports
  • Prepare proposals to offer services and products and gather data on the characteristics of sites
  • Prepare estimates and ensure they work to budgets
  • Ensure staff receive all the necessary training.
Working Conditions: 

Standard working hours for a Head Gardener/Head Grounds Maintenance Worker are 35 to 37 a week, Monday to Friday. At times actual hours worked may be more flexible, according to the season and jobs in hand, and sometimes include evenings and weekends.

A fair amount of time is spent working on plans, budgets, project organisation, administration and communication to all the various partnership organisations and the public.

However, the majority of time is spent outdoors in all weathers, visiting parks, open spaces, sports areas or depots where teams and equipment are based. Their work involves considerable walking around sites. 

Some parks officers manage work at sites that are some distance apart. A driving licence may therefore be necessary.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries are usually from around £17,000 a year
  • Experienced Head Gardener/Head Grounds Maintenance Worker can earn up to £27,000 or more
  • Senior positions may earn up to £40,000 or more.
Skills: 
  • Good knowledge of parks management and landscape design
  • Enthusiastic, with the ability to motivate staff, colleagues and local residents
  • Good planner, project manager and able to prioritise tasks
  • Good staff management and delegation skills
  • Excellent verbal and written communication skills
  • Able to establish effective rapport with customers
  • Respond quickly to customers seeking assistance
  • Understand relevant health and safety issues
  • Work within budgets and to meet deadlines
  • Administrative and computer skills needed for planning and budgeting.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a genuine interest in gardens and landscape design
  • Be committed to providing pleasant, useful and safe environments for residents and visitors
  • Flexibility
  • Friendly and approachable.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Horticulture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Horticulture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Horticulture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Jobs are available throughout the UK working for local councils and private businesses involved in park and open space management.

Vacancies may be advertised in local newspapers and in The Guardian public sector section. Useful websites include LG Jobs for local government vacancies, Total Jobs (public sector and services section) and individual council websites. Jobs bulletins may be available from local councils, libraries, local community and employment offices.

There are no set academic requirements for entry to this job, but most employers expect applicants to have at least five GCSE grades (A*-C) and some qualifications and/or experience in horticulture or landscape work. Practical work experience or voluntary work in these fields is useful.

Some applicants start their careers as gardeners or groundsman and work their way up, taking horticultural or management courses while they are working. Direct applicants with management qualifications or other local amenity management experience may be considered.

It may also be possible to enter this career through completion of an appropriate apprenticeship scheme.

Apprenticeships provide structured training with an employer. Apprenticeships are flexible training programmes tailored to meet the needs of a business. They combine practical and theoretical skills, and are designed to help employees reach a high level of competency and performance. More information can be found on the Apprenticeship website

Getting On: 

There may be opportunities for promotion to senior or management positions, especially in councils with larger parks departments. Some people move to management positions in other areas of council work.

Promotion opportunities may be less in some private companies. Employees sometimes progress by moving into other areas of amenity and leisure management.

A to Z: 

Social Forester

Job Description: 

Social Foresters are involved in using trees and woodlands to deliver social benefits to all groups within society. Social Foresters work with groups of people to promote improved well-being and mental health.

A Social Forester needs to have a range of practical forestry work skills and also be skilled at working with diverse groups of people.

Social Foresters will work to organise events, activities and projects to increase social involvement and interaction within woodlands. These activities may include working with schools, social groups and individuals on tree planting schemes, the production of wood products, such as hurdles and timber shingles, and assisting with educational activities.

A major part of social forestry is an understanding of the physical, emotional and psychological benefits that woodlands have on people. Social Foresters may work with individuals or groups on woodland activities that are educational or therapeutic.

Woodland management activities may include tree planting, coppicing and harvesting. Identification and removal of invasive plants and the identification and control of pests and diseases is also important.

Managerial work undertaken can involve the development of a business plan, marketing and control of budgets, preparing applications for funding or assessing planning applications. Managers may also be involved in the recruitment and supervision of staff and volunteers.

Working Conditions: 

Work can be physically demanding and Social Foresters need to be prepared to work outdoors in all weathers.

Social Foresters typically work full-time. However, the hours may vary and weekend or Bank Holiday work can be required.

It is potentially hazardous work and protective clothing may need to be worn for certain tasks. Tools, equipment and any protective clothing required to undertake the job are usually provided by the employer.

Depending on the area covered, there may be a significant amount of travelling between different sites. A driving licence may be required.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries are around £19,000 a year
  • With experience, a Social Forester may earn around £24,000 - £27,000 a year.
Skills: 
  • Communicate information and knowledge
  • Prepare learning and development programme
  • Deliver interpretive activities
  • Produce interpretive media
  • Identify learning and development needs
  • Consult and work with local communities
  • Manage planted areas
  • Investigate community and social forestry opportunities and activities
  • Fell trees
  • Plant trees.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Working with others
  • Communication
  • Safety awareness
  • Accepting social values
  • Input into community projects or fundraising events
  • Developing enterprise
  • Self-motivated
  • Flexible
  • Energetic.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Trees and Timber Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Trees and Timber

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Trees and Timber and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Many people who come to work within Social Forestry will have had some experience working in a related area, such as arboriculture, forestry or environmental science.

Interest in Social Forestry has increased and there are projects running in many of the larger towns and cities across Britain. Jobs may be found within local government and charitable trusts, such as the Woodland Trust. Vacancies are advertised directly through the local or national press and on organisations' websites.

The Small Woods Association is a good starting point and offers a range of training programmes for those wishing to work in this sector.

Getting On: 

It may be possible to progress to higher grades within similar roles, taking on greater supervisory responsibility. However, this will vary depending upon the nature of the employer.

Progression beyond the role will tend to be into a more managerial role, which will involve less ‘hands on’ practical work.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals

  • Chartered Forester - ICF
  • Forestry Journal
  • Horticulture Week
  • Quarterly Journal of Forestry - Royal Forestry Society.

Jobs

Forestry jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Sexer

Job Description: 

A Sexer (Poultry) works in a hatchery where eggs are incubated and hatched to produce young birds such as chickens or ducklings. Determining the sex of the birds is necessary in order to separate them. Identifying males from females can be difficult and requires close examination by a Sexer.

If the young birds have been bred and hatched to eventually produce eggs for the food chain as mature ‘layers’, only the female birds will be required. Therefore, these need to be separated from the male chicks.

Birds bred for meat will also sometimes be sexed depending on individual company requirements.

To determine the sex of the young birds, care needs to be taken in the catching, handling, examination and movement, to ensure that birds are not stressed or harmed.

Working Conditions: 

Sexers will generally work as least 39 hours per week, but it may be necessary to work paid overtime during busy periods.

Most sexing takes place in the early morning. There are also opportunities for part-time and casual work.

Most Sexers would work inside where young birds are hatched and cared for in warm, monitored conditions.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Some Sexers work freelance and may earn between £20-£30 per hour.

Skills: 
  • Maintain site biosecurity
  • Assist with preparing livestock for transfer
  • Assist with the selection of livestock
  • Handle and restrain livestock.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Use of own initiative
  • Self confidence
  • Attention to detail
  • Safety awareness
  • Flexibility
  • Mobility.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To work in the poultry industry you will need to like working with birds.

New entrants or those with less than a years experience in the poultry industry would need to attend short training courses to ensure they are trained to the minimum standard as set by the British Poultry Training Initiative. The Sexer role is placed at Level 1.

It is the employer’s duty to provide the training as required in order to meet their farm assurance standards.

For more information about poultry careers visit the British Poultry Council.

Getting On: 

Sexing is a very specialist role which takes a lot of training to become skilled at.  Most Sexers do this as a profession – some could progress to a Senior Sexer responsible for a team.

Due to the size and structure of the poultry industry there are many opportunities to progress and move between farms and companies.

The British Poultry Training Initiative keeps a record of all the training you have completed, similar to a CV, called the Poultry Passport. This can be accessed and updated as you progress through the industry and between poultry industry employers.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found in the following websites and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • A Life on the Land
  • Scientific Farm Animal Production – Pearson Education
  • Farmers weekly
  • Farmers Guardian
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Service Technician

Also known as: 

Farm-based or independent non-franchised engineer or technician or engineer; Tractor Technician; Green Crop Technician; Forestry Harvesting Technician; Combine Technician.

Job Description: 

You will enter this industry as a trainee and work in a dealership to get experience of working on a wide range of vehicles and machinery used in:  

  • Farming businesses
  • Forestry businesses
  • Horticultural businesses
  • Ground care and sports facilities including golf courses and parks.  

As a trainee technician you will play an important role in supporting technicians, workshop and repair activities as well as carrying out basic routine repair work when required. 

You will play an important role in keeping equipment in good working order through planned maintenance, as well as carrying out any diagnostic and repair work when required.

After completing your training and after several years of experience at a dealership you may wish to become self employed you will need to be highly skilled and will need to find your client base. 

After some years of being self-employed you may need to go back into industry to refresh your skills many self-employed technicians will take a full-time role working for a main franchise dealer to upskill as without updates you will only be able to work on older equipment which will limit your client base. 

You will work from your own van and will travel to farms and businesses where you are required.  . 

As a Technician you may work on, or support those working on:

  • Complex high technology machinery, such as tractors, harvesters, sprayers, processors and planters, some of which use the latest technology including global positioning systems (GPS), electronic mapping and guidance systems
  • Professional and domestic ground care machinery such as compact tractors, rotary tillers, cultivators, quad bikes, grass collectors, mowers, chainsaws and hedge trimmers
  • Equipment used in livestock handling and control, including milking systems, mobile handlers and feeding systems
  • Machinery used in forestry include tree harvesters, chippers and stump grinders.

Land-based Technicians will use a wide range of hand and specialist tools, often including diagnostic equipment and laptop computers.

Working Conditions: 

Technicians in the land-based sector usually work 37.5 hours a week. This may include early mornings, evenings and weekends, to meet deadlines and seasonal requirements. 

Service Technicians usually work in well-equipped workshops or on site from service vehicles equipped as mobile workshops.  Technicians will spend time travelling to and from customers’ premises where it may be necessary to work outside, in all terrains and weather conditions. 

Working with agricultural, forestry and horticultural equipment can be hazardous and Service Technicians will need to wear protective clothing, high-visibility vests and in some cases hard hats. For some jobs you may also need safety glasses and welding aprons. 

A clean driving licence and reliable transport is essential. 

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • As a Trainee Service Technician your starting salary will be between £8,000 and £10,000 per year, depending on your age
  • A Qualified Service Technician may range from around £27,000 to £35,000 a year dependent on age and experience
  • A Diagnostic Technician with advance skills may earn £38,000 or more
  • Incorporated land-based engineers may earn up to £40,000 a year
  • Chartered Land-based Engineers may earn £60,000 or more.

Self-employed Service Technicians may get a higher salary dependent on their specialisation and customer base but will also have specific overheads to pay. 

If you are employed transport maybe provided by employers

Skills: 
  • Diagnostic skills
  • Advanced engineering skills
  • Be able to operate plant and machinery
  • Mentoring and coaching skills
  • High level of engineering/management skills
  • Providing land-based machinery technical support and advice to colleagues
  • Servicing and maintaining a wide range of plant and machinery
  • A high level of IT literacy as much of your work will involve computer work for machine diagnostics
  • A driving licence. 

Additional skills will be required if the Technician is self-employed:   

  • Time management
  • Budgeting
  • Financial management
  • Business management
  • All round knowledge of the engineering business.
Personal Qualities: 
  • The ability to work alone or in a team
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to solve problems.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Land-Based Engineering Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Land-Based Engineering

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Land-Based Engineering and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is possible to enter land-based engineering as a Trainee Service Technician.

There are two routes for people to enter the industry either through an Apprenticeship or and Industry Apprenticeship with a dealer/manufacturer. 

Entry requirements vary but most employers expect 4 GCSEs (A-C) or equivalent, including Maths, English and Science or Technology along with ICT skills. 

Having a clean full driving licence will also improve employment opportunities.

Getting On: 

The Land-based Technician Accreditation (LTA) programme sets out a recognised career path which is related to pay scales. 

Further information can be found on the Institution of Agricultural Engineers (IAgrE) web site which also provides information and support on the routes to professional registration. 

Experienced Service Technicians may be able to progress to a wider range of specialist roles once they have qualified and completed an Apprenticeship, including:  

  • Green crop
  • Combine
  • Tractor
  • Forestry/harvesting or diagnostic technician
  • Master technician
  • Workshop supervisor
  • Service manager
  • Sales representative.

There may also be opportunities for self employment and building a successful business. 

With appropriate qualifications and experience, it may be possible to move into training, possibly as a college technician or college lecturer. 

It is also possible to progress into sales or managerial positions as well as moving onto manufactures and importers of machinery. 

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • A World of Opportunity (Careertrack)
  • Real Life Guides
  • Engineering Technician
  • Identification of Parts Failure - John Deere Publishing
  • The dealer
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Classic Tractor
  • Tractor Dealer
  • Arable farmer
  • Turf Care.
A to Z: 

Sales Manager

Also known as: 

Branch Manager.

Job Description: 

The Sales Manager is in charge of a branch of a business or organisation. The branch is usually located away from the main office. They are often expected to be able to work at a distance from their direct manager, who may be based at the organisation’s head office

The role of the Sales Manager involves supervising staff. They are often expected to be committed to the expansion and success of the business and must ensure that the customer is satisfied.

Development of the organisation’s employees is a key part of the role, to ensure that employees get the appropriate support and are given suitable training opportunities.

The branch manager is also expected to determine and manage a budget, ensuring that funds are allocated appropriately and for the benefit of the wider organisation in order to meet its objectives

Sales Managers are responsible for any of the following areas: commercial business, productivity, reporting, hiring and firing, marketing and advertising, and buying and selling. They are the immediate person that handles all the issues relating to matters at a particular company location.

Sales Managers research, assess, recommend changes, enforce company protocols, and deal with company security issues. They coordinate with the head office and other branch locations, whether local or national.

A Sales Manager usually performs any of the following tasks:

  • Assessing sales reports
  • Drafting and executing market plans
  • Training
  • Mentoring
  • Mediating
  • Motivating employees
  • Adhering to regulations
  • Meeting targets and deadlines
  • Ensuring the company make profits
  • Budgeting
  • Enforcing safety measures.
Working Conditions: 

The Sales Manager is often in charge of a branch of a business or organisation. The branch is usually located away from the main office. They are often expected to be able to work at a distance from their direct manager, who may be based at the organisation’s head office.

The Sales Manager will work with other teams such as the parts and service teams.

Attending monthly management meetings and carrying out staff appraisals is an important part of the role.

Sales Managers have typical office hours but may work long shifts especially at busy time of the year so they can meet customer requirements.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Salary levels vary widely depending on experience and on the employing organisation. 

The average salary for this position is £30,000 per year.

Skills: 
  • Communicating with a range of people
  • Leading a team
  • Project management
  • Organising and managing people
  • Quality assurance
  • Liaising with customers to identify their requirements
  • Improving productivity
  • Manage an annual budget
  • Experience in the supervision and management of employees.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Good organisation skills
  • Able to make decisions.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Land-Based Engineering Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Land-Based Engineering

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Land-Based Engineering and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Sales Managers need to have a degree in a related field. Having a Bachelor's Degree in Business Management, Finance, Economics, or Administration is important. People who possess a Master's Degree will have a better opportunity of acquiring jobs or receiving promotion to the position Sales Manager.

The Sales Manager may have worked as sales person and gained further training and experience to enable them to progress to the role of Sales Manager.

Getting On: 

Most opportunities will come from working for all sizes of business, but progression from the Sales/Branch Manager will depend on the opportunities available and this may mean moving to another organisation.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publication

A World of Opportunity (Careertrack).

A to Z: 

Safety/Quality Manager

Also known as: 

Contracts Manager.

Job Description: 

The Safety/Quality Manager, also known as Contracts Manager, works within the business and is responsible for all safety and quality systems and management.

Supported by the office managers and site foremen/supervisors, they are responsible for process and procedures, personnel management, staff development and the promotion of health and safety within the workplace.

In all activity, the Safety/Quality Manager must demonstrate commitment to the safety and welfare of the staff for whom they are responsible, and control the environment within the business and on site.

There is a considerable amount of record keeping involved and candidates must have very competent IT, and system skills.

Safety/Quality managers are often responsible for:

  • Supervision of health and safety and quality for the business and all staff
  • Maintaining a safe work environment and environmentally friendly work practices
  • Performance and health and safety management
  • Understanding and complying with audit requirements.

The fencing industry incorporates several main areas of work:

  • Boundary fencing – domestic and agricultural (post and rail, post and panel, strained wire)
  • Vehicle restraint - roads and motorways
  • Sound proof barriers
  • Parapets and bridges
  • Security fencing, prisons, airports
  • Electric fencing and gates.

There are estimated to be approximately 3,150 Fencing businesses throughout the UK employing 27,000 people. Job opportunities occur in urban and rural areas.

Safety/Quality Managers  are employed by large construction groups working on major building projects, by landscaping or fencing companies, and by motorway, road or rail network companies.

Working Conditions: 

Fencing businesses can operate seven days a week. Therefore employees usually work flexible hours based around the jobs that need completing. In larger businesses, they are likely to work on a rota system with other members of staff. This will include early mornings, evenings and weekends.

However this role involves working mainly in the office, but there are occasions when they will have to go on site.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer, the location and the experience of the employee. The fencing industry usually offers good rates of pay.

A Safety/Quality/Contracts Manager can expect to earn up to £44,000 per year.

Skills: 
  • Develop and monitor quality procedures/strategies
  • Establish and maintain quality assurance systems
  • Report on compliance with quality systems
  • Manage working relationships
  • Promote good standards of health and safety
  • Manage workloads
  • Maintain records
  • Receive and communicate information.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Able to make decisions
  • Able to use initiative
  • Good attention to detail.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Fencing Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Fencing

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Fencing and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

You can gain promotion to this position from industry if you have the right skills and knowledge and have experience and qualifications in quality and health and safety management.

You will need to demonstrate enthusiasm, self-motivation and leadership and management skills, as well as a sound understanding of industry management practices, including Vehicle Restraint Systems, parapets and electric fencing, and awareness of environmental issues.

Getting On: 

There may be opportunities for Safety/Quality Managers to be promoted to General Business Managers or Directors.

However as there are a limited number of jobs within small businesses it may be necessary to move to another employer to progress.

Further Information: 

Tel: 02476 696 996 or e-mail careers@lantra.co.uk. You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

  • FaCT
  • FCA Fencing  Contractors Association
  • EFA European Fencing Association.

Publications, magazines and journals (Some may be priced)

  • FISS  Booklet – Sector Schemes
  • Perimeter Fencing.

 

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

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