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Master Technician

Job Description: 

Land-based Master Technicians are able to work on a wide range of general and specialist vehicles and machines used in farming, forestry, horticulture, ground care, sports facilities including golf courses and parks. 

Master Technicians can be either self employed or employed but would have done initial training with a distributor.

They play an important role in supporting management activity. They also work with Technicians within a business and have a wide range of skills. 

They are also able to mentor internal staff and provide support and feedback to manufactures in terms of updating and development of new and existing machines and equipment. 

Land-based Master Technicians will use a wide range of specialist tools, often including diagnostic equipment and laptop computers.

Working Conditions: 

Land-based Master technicians normally work a standard full time week, but additional work is often required, including early mornings, evenings and weekends, to meet deadlines and seasonal requirements.

They usually work in well-equipped workshops or on site from a service vehicle equipped as a mobile workshop. They will spend time travelling to customers’ premises where it may be necessary to work outside, in all terrains and weather conditions.

Land-based Master Technicians wear personal protective equipment (PPE) including overalls and safety boots. For some jobs they need other protective clothing, including safety glasses and welding aprons.

A driving licence is essential.

Working with agricultural, forestry and horticultural equipment can be hazardous and engineers may need to wear protective clothing, high-visibility vests and hard hats.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • The starting salary for a Master Technician may range from around £32,000 to £40,000 a year depending on age
  • Chartered Land-based Engineers may earn £60,000 or more.

Transport will be provided by employers.

Skills: 
  • Be able to run diagnostic tests on complex machinery and equipment
  • Be able to control and adjust machine settings via IT, recording and analysing data
  • Carrying out repairs
  • Mentoring and supporting other technicians in terms of skills and knowledge
  • Servicing and maintaining a wide range of plant and machinery
  • Adjusting and setting equipment to operate correctly
  • Replacing parts and making new components if necessary
  • Using techniques such as welding to make repairs
  • Referring to technical information and repair manuals.
Personal Qualities: 
  • The ability to work as part of a team
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to solve problems
  • Able to use initiative.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Land-Based Engineering Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Land-Based Engineering

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Land-Based Engineering and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are currently more than 3350 businesses in the industry in the UK. Much of the work is based in rural areas but there are also many opportunities in towns and cities, especially for those technicians specialising in ground care machinery. 

Master Technicians enter this career by:

  • Studying for a degree in agricultural engineering or AA related subject, such as environmental, mechanical or automotive engineering. Entry to a relevant degree course is usually with a minimum of two A levels, including maths and a science subject, and five GCSEs (grades A-C, or the equivalent)
  • Craft or technician level, by following an Apprenticeship or studying towards a relevant qualification, such as a Work-based Diploma (previous NVQ title) or the National Diploma in Agricultural Engineering
  • Joining one of the larger manufacturers that provide specialist apprentice training for those working in their dealer network. These schemes are usually run in partnership with a further education college.

Master Technicians are employed by equipment manufactures and distributors, farmers and contractors. 

There may also be opportunities with sports club, local authorities and specialist companies offering servicing and repair for a range of equipment. 

Getting On: 

There are currently more than 3350 businesses in the industry in the UK. Much of the work is based in rural areas but there are also many opportunities in towns and cities, especially for those technicians specialising in ground care machinery. 

Master Technicians enter this career by:

  • Studying for a degree in agricultural engineering or AA related subject, such as environmental, mechanical or automotive engineering. Entry to a relevant degree course is usually with a minimum of two A levels, including maths and a science subject, and five GCSEs (grades A-C, or the equivalent)
  • Craft or technician level, by following an Apprenticeship or studying towards a relevant qualification, such as a Work-based Diploma (previous NVQ title) or the National Diploma in Agricultural Engineering
  • Joining one of the larger manufacturers that provide specialist apprentice training for those working in their dealer network. These schemes are usually run in partnership with a further education college.

Master Technicians are employed by equipment manufactures and distributors, farmers and contractors. 

There may also be opportunities with sports club, local authorities and specialist companies offering servicing and repair for a range of equipment. 

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • A World of Opportunity (Careertrack)
  • Real Life Guides
  • Engineering Technician
  • Identification of Parts Failure - John Deere Publishing
  • The dealer
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Classic Tractor
  • Tractor Dealer
  • Arable farmer
  • Turf Care.
A to Z: 

Technical Advisor

Also known as: 

Technical Consultant; Farm Business Advisor/Consultant; Agricultural Extension Officer; Feed/Additive/Animal Health Specialist/Sales Advisor; Crop Advisors/Agronomists.

Job Description: 

Technical Advisors offer an advisory service and specialist support to farmers. They advise and work with farmers to make sure that the farm enterprise, for example crop production or rearing livestock, are performing at their best.

This may involve identifying and providing solutions to overcome technical problems, such as diseases in crops or livestock, feeding livestock, farm building construction as well as monitoring the financial impact of changes.

Technical Advisors may have a specialism in one area, such as dairy livestock, poultry, farm mechanisation or farm management or agronomy. They may advise farmers on one particular area as well as assist with business planning and cash flow budgeting.

Tasks may include:

  • Giving presentations and organising demonstrations
  • Facilitating farmer discussion groups and knowledge transfer
  • Collecting and analysing information
  • Planning  the use of pest control measures and implementing plans for pest control
  • Working out better ways of keeping and feeding livestock
  • Advising on developing new crops and more efficient methods for growing crops
  • Advising growers and farmers on how to get the best out of their business
  • Planning and agreeing the management of livestock systems
  • Liaising with businesses which produce seeds or chemicals for agriculture and horticulture to find out about their products
  • Writing reports
  • Keeping up-to-date on developments in the industry.

Technical Advisors can work closely with farmers and growers, manufacturers of products such as animal feeds and seeds, Veterinary Surgeons and with Agricultural Scientists that carry out research. They use computers for report writing and specialist equipment for carrying out tests when necessary.

Some Technical Advisors also work in research and development, and extension work where scientific research results are put into practice on a farm. Technical Advisors will often be part of a company that sells its services to the agricultural industry such as a farm consultancy firm or a livestock feed manufacturer, so will ideally need sales and marketing skills as well as technical skills.

Working Conditions: 

Technical Advisors normally work 39 hours per week. However, they may have to work outside of these hours depending on their role as they may need to visit farms at convenient times for the farmer and certain times of the year that are busier than others e.g. February to June for Agronomists.

A lot of the work is carried out in an office or on the farm. If research or analysis is part of the role, sometimes they will work partly in a laboratory. There may be opportunities for part-time work and job share.

Technical Advisors may have to wear protective clothing on farms, in greenhouses or in laboratories and adhere to biosecurity requirements to ensure infections are not spread from farm to farm.

This work may not be suitable for people with allergies to animals or conditions such as hay fever.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live, the area covered, number of customers and responsibility.

  • Salaries start at around £20,000 - £26,500 a year
  • With experience, salaries can rise to around £33,000 to £44,000 a year
  • Salaries in senior posts could be £50,000 or more.

Other benefits may include a company car, pension scheme, health care.

Skills: 
  • Manage budgets and develop marketing and sales plans
  • Provide financial forecasts
  • Analyse information and present it in an easily understood format
  • Monitor and control the use of resources
  • Communication skills
  • Good sales and marketing skills
  • Plan and agree the management of systems within the enterprise
  • Monitor and evaluate the management of systems
  • Recommend improvements to environmental performance
  • Develop, negotiate and agree proposals to offer services and products.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Accurate, with good attention to detail
  • Well organised
  • Able to adopt a flexible approach to work.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are opportunities for Technical Advisors throughout the country.

Many farm consultancy firms will offer development schemes for Graduates or Assistant Farm Consultants to be trained and gain experience in analysing farm accounts, technical specialisms, sales and marketing, working towards becoming a Technical Advisor.

Experience of farm work or horticulture is normally required along with a sound knowledge of farm management.

Most Technical Advisors will hold a degree in agriculture or a related science. Degree subjects include animal nutrition, animal science, biological science, crop science, and horticulture and soil science. Courses are offered by many universities and colleges throughout the UK.

Entry to a degree course requires at least two A-level grades, normally including chemistry and maths, or another science subject. Alternative equivalent qualifications may be accepted.

A postgraduate degree in a specialist subject such as animal production, soil science, seed and crop technology or poultry science could be helpful.

Once a level of training and experience has been gained, Technical Advisors can join professional bodies to continue their professional development, such as the Institute of Agricultural Management, British Institute of Agricultural Consultants, BASIS professional register for agronomists, Association of Independent Crop Consultants, depending on the chosen specialism.

Getting On: 

With experience, Technical Advisors can move into more senior positions, become industry leaders in their technical specialism and move into management roles leading a team of consultants within their firms. This may involve more office-based work and less time travelling to farms and other outlets.

With the appropriate qualifications there may also be opportunities to teach at university or college. Since land-based industries are worldwide, there are opportunities for working abroad, sometimes in parts of the world where farming and growing methods are less well developed than in the UK.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals:

  • A Life on the Land
  • Scientific Farm Animal Production – Pearson Education
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Farmers Guardian
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Unit Manager

Also known as: 

Production Manager; Sheep/Dairy/Beef/Pig Manager; Section Manager.

Job Description: 

A Unit Manager on a farm is responsible for the management of all the sections within the unit. This may include managing the breeding livestock to the finishing unit. The Unit Manager may also responsible for all of the Section Head staff members.

The type of farm will determine the kind of jobs the Unit Manager will undertake but it could include responsibility for the day to day tasks such as maintaining the health and welfare of livestock to preparing animals for sale or breeding.

Some farms buy in young livestock and rear them to replace their own animals where as other farms breed their own.  However, the Unit Manager will be responsible for:  

  • Planning and setting production targets, and budgets
  • Monitoring the quality of their produce and performance of the unit including health and welfare
  • Managing people, recruiting for the unit, managing and mentoring staff
  • Purchasing materials needed for the unit, such as animal feed
  • Ensuring the unit is operating within the legal guidelines set by bodies such as the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra), the European Union (EU) and the Health and Safety Executive (HSE)
  • Working with their vet to prepare and monitor health and welfare plans
  • Ensuring the waste from the unit is managed correctly.

On smaller farms, Unit Managers may be involved with general tasks such as feeding livestock, driving tractors and operating and repairing machinery

Working Conditions: 

Unit Managers generally work as least 39 hours per week but it may be necessary to work paid overtime during busy periods. Unit Managers may be required to cover for their Section Heads if necessary and help with particular tasks on the unit.

The working conditions will depend on the farm. Some farms keep livestock indoors all year, e.g. pig units, whereas other farms with cattle will keep their animals in for the wetter part of the year but put them out to grass in the summer months. 

Some farms grow crops which will need to be managed. Some farmers may do a mixture of production systems depending on their soil conditions, farm location, and the breed and ages of livestock they keep.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These salaries can vary according to the responsibility:

  • Starting salaries for Unit Manager role are at least £20,000 - £25,000  a year
  • With experience, a Unit Manager may earn up to £30,000 -£35,000 and sometimes more.

Individual employers may pay more according to the employee’s skills and experience.

Some Unit Managers will be provided with rent-free accommodation and a vehicle. There may also be other benefits such as free farm produce and a pension scheme.

Skills: 
  • Monitor and maintain the health, safety and security of the workplace
  • Purchase products or services for the land-based organisation
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of Livestock
  • Establish, implement and maintain hygiene and bio-security arrangements
  • Organise livestock/crop sales and purchases
  • Manage a budget
  • Plan what people the business needs
  • Carry out and implement plans for the business.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Self confidence
  • Attention to detail
  • Able to solve problems
  • Work in a team/with others
  • Flexibility
  • Use own initiative.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to enjoy working with livestock or crops and the normal route into this career is to enter as a General Farm Worker and from there you may progress to an Assistant Unit Manager or straight to a Unit Manager depending on the type and size of farm.

Although there are no set requirements, most Unit Managers would have a qualification in agriculture or a related subject and usually several years’ practical experience which is valued by employers.

Land-based colleges run a range of relevant full-time and part-time qualifications and courses that can be taken prior to starting work, as well as while at work

The size of a farm has a direct relation to the number of specific roles and opportunities for employees to progress. There is competition for these vacancies and movement from farm to farm to gain experience and promotion is usual.

Getting On: 

With the right qualifications and further experience in other farm businesses and enterprises, a Unit Manager could gain promotion to a Farm Manager, with ultimate responsibility for the unit as well as other farm enterprises, such as the arable business.

All agricultural workers need to keep up-to-date with the latest developments in their sector. Increasingly, employees in agriculture participate in Continuing Professional Development (CPD) courses to enable them to enhance their skills, knowledge and careers.

Some parts of the industry have specific schemes such as the PIPR (Pig Industry Professional Register) which aims to encourage people to better themselves and progress within the pig industry through CPD. CPD points are available in a variety of areas including:

  • Training Courses
  • Technical Meetings
  • Meetings with Vet/Consultants
  • Conferences
  • Trade Shows
  • Subscribing to industry journals, such as Pig World.

For those wishing to progress into farm management, a degree course in subjects such as agriculture or farm management may also be an option.

There may also be opportunities to work abroad.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • A Life on the Land
  • Scientific Farm Animal Production - Pearson Education
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Farmers Guardian
  • Dairy Farmer
  • Sheep Farmer
  • Beef Farmer
  • Poultry Farmer
A to Z: 
Industry: 

VRS Installer

Job Description: 

Vehicle Restraint System (VRS) Installers work outdoors as part of a team erecting and repairing the many thousands of miles of barriers along our roads and motorways, usually working under the direction of the Lead installer or Forman. 

They focus on all aspects including setting out, erection and repair.

VRS Installers are employed by large construction groups working on major road building projects and by the organisations responsible for maintaining our motorways and roads.

Working Conditions: 

Vehicle Restraint System Contractors / Installers operate seven days a week and often 24 hours a day. Therefore VRS Installers usually work flexible hours based around the jobs that need completing at different times of day and night. This is likely to be on a rota system with other members of staff. This will include early mornings, evenings, nights and weekends.

There may be opportunities for both full-time and temporary working.

VRS Installers need to be comfortable working outside and meet all of the qualifications and training required to work on the highways. Most of their working time is spent outdoors in all weather conditions.

The work itself is active and involves repairing and replacing highways barriers so therefore there is a lot of heavy lifting and carrying, digging and machine operation.

Many vehicle restraint contractors cover a wide area so there is likely to be a requirement to travel or work away from home.

VRS Installers need to have the FISS (Fencing Industry Skills Scheme) CSCS (Construction Skills Card Scheme) blue card.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer, the location and the experience of the employee. The fencing industry usually offers good rates of pay and overtime is often available.

  • VRS Installers may earn £33,000 - £38,000 a year.

Sometimes accommodation allowance and use of a vehicle will be offered as part of the package

Skills: 
  • Communication with colleagues and supervisors during installations
  • Plan and manage workloads
  • Maintain records
  • Plan and manage resources
  • Maintain environmental good practice at work
  • Prepare and operate tools and equipment
  • Operate plant and machinery
  • Install vehicle control systems.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to prioritise work
  • Able to use initiative
  • Flexible and adaptable.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Fencing Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Fencing

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Fencing and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Experience is an advantage, but training is usually given. Apprenticeships are often a useful way of entering the industry which provides opportunities to progress to the VRS Installer.

VRS Contractors usually advertise in local press or in trade publications or online, so this could be a good place to start your job search.

Getting On: 

There may be opportunities to move to a Lead installer or Foreman position depending on individual performance, skills and knowledge and size of the business.

Further Information: 

Tel: 02476 696 996 or e-mail careers@lantra.co.uk. You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

  • FaCT
  • FCA Fencing Contractors Association
  • EFA European Fencing Association.

Publications, magazines and journals (Some may be priced):

  • FISS  Booklet – Sector Schemes
  • Perimeter Fencing.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Veterinary Surgeon

Also known as: 

Veterinarian.

Job Description: 

Veterinary Surgeons, or Vets, are the medical professionals for the animal kingdom.

A Veterinary Surgeon will:

•    Treat sick and injured animals
•    Advise owners and keepers on how best to care for their animals
•    Diagnose and control animal diseases.

The role is a demanding and responsible one. Vets in practice are expected to deal with emergencies in any species, at any time. Most Vets work in private practice, though some work for government agencies and in industry.

It is essential to have:

•    A keen interest in science
•    A strong affinity for animals, combined with an unsentimental approach.

Working Conditions: 

A Vet may treat:

•    Small/companion animals, such as dogs, cats, rabbits, hamsters, budgies and other pets
•    Exotic animals, such as reptiles, snakes and rarer birds
•    Farm animals, such as cattle, sheep and pigs - vets in this type of practice are more concerned with the health of the overall herd or flock
•    Equines - horses, ponies and donkeys.

A veterinary practice may cover all types of animal or specialise in one or more. Some specialised practitioners also treat zoo animals, working to improve their survival and reproduction in captivity.

Daily tasks might include:

•    Diagnosing conditions, sometimes with the aid of X-rays or lab tests
•    Emergency life-saving measures
•    Vaccinating animals against diseases
•    Prescribing drugs
•    Setting fractures
•    Delivering newborn animals
•    Performing surgery.

Euthanasia or humane killing is also part of the job. This may be required when sick animals have no prospect of recovery, when their treatment would cost more than their value or as part of a culling programme to control disease.

Vets keep comprehensive records. They may work with other Vets and support staff in their practice and supervise the work of Veterinary Nurses.

Vets who work in public health aim to prevent and control animal and human diseases. They may investigate animal and human disease outbreaks such as foot and mouth disease. They also assess the safety of food processing plants and abattoirs.

Vets in industry develop, test and supervise production of drugs, chemicals and biological products.
A full-time Vet in general practice typically works about 43 hours a week and takes a share in on-call emergency work at night and at weekends.  Many Vets also work part-time.

Vets working in industry or government generally have more regular hours than those in clinical practice.

Most Vets work in surgeries or clinics or visit the owners’ premises. For farm and equine Vets, much of the work is outdoors in all weathers. They may have to travel long distances to visit clients in rural areas. A driving licence is important for many clinical posts.

Vets wear protective clothing appropriate to the task in hand. The job can be physically demanding and vets need to be alert to the risk of injury from animals.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Salary packages for most new graduates start from around £31,000, which may include the value of accommodation as well as fuel and other allowances
  • Vets with five to ten years’ experience can earn salary and rewards worth between £40,800 and £50,000
  • A Senior Partner in a veterinary practice can earn up to £100,000.
Skills: 

...

Personal Qualities: 

•    An aptitude for science
•    A commitment to animal welfare
•    An enquiring mind
•    Good observation skills
•    Good communication skills
•    A caring and approachable manner
•    Able to talk to all kinds of people
•    The ability to explain complex issues in a simple way
•    Able to handle emotional distress in owners - when an animal dies, for instance - while keeping an emotional distance themselves
•    Able to cope with the physical demands of the job
•    Well organised.

Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Veterinary Activities Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Veterinary Activities

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Veterinary Activities and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Vets must complete a degree approved by the Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS).

Seven veterinary schools in the UK provide approved degree courses. They are in Bristol, Cambridge, Edinburgh, Glasgow, London, Liverpool and University of Nottingham. The courses are listed on the RCVS website.

The degree course lasts five years (six at Cambridge).

Applicants need three A levels at high grades, usually including biology and chemistry. The other subject should be physics or maths. Some universities accept a third A level in a non-science subject that is academically sound. GCSEs (A*-C) in English, maths and science are also required, as well as in biology and physics for those who do not have those subjects at A level.

Candidates also need to show they have gained a range of practical experience of working with animals. This might include visiting a laboratory or voluntary work at stables, farms or kennels, as well as shadowing a vet in practice.

Some universities will consider applicants with relevant vocational qualifications,
For students who do not have the required grades or subjects, some universities offer a six-year course. The first year focuses on science subjects, to prepare students for the five-year degree.

It may also be possible to study abroad. The RCVS approves some degrees in Europe, the United States, Canada, Australia, New Zealand and South Africa.

While competition for veterinary degrees is keen, there are many employment opportunities for qualified Vets.

Getting On: 

Most graduates start work as an Assistant or Junior Vet in a practice, hospital or clinic, before progressing to more senior roles.

Established Vets may buy into a practice, or set up their own business. They advance their careers by marketing the business and building a good reputation.

There may be opportunities to specialise or to move into teaching or public health. With specialised training, Vets can work in research and development for pharmaceutical and biomedical research firms.

There are more than 20,000 Veterinary Surgeons in the UK. Most work in private practice.

Other employers include:

•    University veterinary schools and research institutes
•    Government bodies, such as the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA), Animal Health, the Food Standards Agency and the Meat Hygiene Service
•    The Royal Army Veterinary Corps
•    Pharmaceutical and pet food companies
•    Charities such as the RSPCA (Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals) and PDSA (People’s Dispensary for Sick Animals)
•    Zoos and wildlife centres.

Further Information: 

•    Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS). Tel: 020 7222 2001 e-mail: admin@rcvs.org.uk  
•    British Small Animal Veterinary Association (BSAVA). Tel: 01452 726 700 e-mail: customerservices@bsava.com  
•    British Veterinary Association
•    British Equine Veterinary Association (BEVA)
•    UCAS, University and College Entrance: The Official Guide (published annually).

Publications, magazines and websites (some may be priced):

•    Veterinary Record
•    Veterinary Times  
•    RCVS News
•    Veterinary Practice.

A to Z: 

Head Forester

Also known as: 

Forest Manager.

Job Description: 

The Head Forester may have progressed from a working role in the woodland into this more managerial position. In addition to being responsible for the management of Forestry Workers, they will also undertake the planning of planting and harvesting activities and the monitoring and management of planted areas.

The role may also include significant conservation work, such as creating and restoring native woodlands. The type of practical work carried out on site will vary depending upon the nature of their employer, the type and location of the woodlands being managed. Working in private woodland or for the Forestry Commission will often require a wider range of skills and knowledge including land management skills.

A Head Forester will also usually have to control a budget and follow a business plan developed for the sites they manage. Some Head Foresters may manage several forests with Assistant Head Foresters looking after the teams at each location. Their main tasks may include planning the work to be carried out by staff and contractors, managing the maintenance of machinery and equipment, maintaining records of work and ensuring that heath and safety policies are observed. They will also be required to survey and inspect trees and sites, selecting and marking up timber to be harvested as well as planning, monitoring and evaluating habitat management work.

A Head Forester will have an excellent understanding of sustainable forestry and be able to achieve high standards of environmental quality, protection and conservation.

Working Conditions: 

Forest and woodland managers need a range of technical and professional skills. There will be significant indoor and outdoor work.

Work can be physically demanding and Head Foresters need to be prepared to work outdoors in a range of weather conditions.

Head Foresters typically work full-time with some of the time spent office based,.  However, the hours may vary and weekend or Bank Holiday work can be required.  

It is potentially hazardous work, requiring the use of power tools and heavy machinery. Protective clothing may need to be worn for certain tasks.   Tools, equipment and any protective clothing required to undertake the job are usually provided by the employer.

Depending on the area covered, there may be a significant amount of travelling between different sites. A driving licence may be required. Occasional periods may be spent working away from home.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salary could be between £16,000 and £21,000
  • Experienced Head Foresters could earn up to £30,000 or more.
Skills: 
  • Measure, record and forecast volume of timber
  • Survey trees
  • Manage harvesting operations
  • Identify the need for, and plan, habitat and ecosystem management work
  • Assess forest and woodland yields
  • Monitor the work of your staff
  • Plan and design a woodland
  • Manage specimen trees
  • Provide financial forecasts
  • Compile and maintain the forest and woodland inventory
  • Work to forest certification standards and regulations.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Responsible
  • Initiative
  • Flexibility
  • Energetic and enthusiastic
  • Good with people.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Trees and Timber Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Trees and Timber

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Trees and Timber and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

The forestry commission, forest management companies, forestry contracting companies, private estates, local authorities, conservation organizations and charities employ head foresters. Most jobs are found in rural locations with large forested areas.

If you are interested in becoming a head forester it is important that you:

  • Enjoy working outside
  • Enjoy practical/physical work
  • Are interested in the environment.

Lists of organisations, voluntary environmental projects and jobs are advertised on the Countryside Jobs Service website. Job vacancies are advertised in national and regional newspapers. 

The Forestry Commission publishes vacancies on its website and the Royal Forestry Society (RFS) lists vacancies in its Quarterly Journal of Forestry.

Many foresters aim to complete the requirements for Chartered Forester or Arboriculturist status from the Institute of Chartered Foresters. This brings a high level of professional recognition within the sector.

Getting On: 

As a Head Forester, progression will depend upon type of organisation that you work for. 

Head Foresters may seek to become Forestry Consultants or move into a forestry contracting role.

Further Information: 

You can find further information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals

  • Chartered Forester - ICF
  • Forestry Journal
  • Horticulture Week
  • Quarterly Journal of Forestry.
 
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Registered Veterinary Nurse

Job Description: 

Registered Veterinary Nurses normally work within a veterinary surgery or veterinary hospital and are involved in a wide range of care and treatment of animals.

Veterinary Nurses provide skilled supportive care for sick animals as well as undertaking minor surgery, monitoring during anaesthesia, medical treatments and diagnostic tests under veterinary supervision. They also play an important role in the education of owners on good standards of animal care and welfare.

There are opportunities to train either as a small animal Veterinary Nurse or as an equine Veterinary Nurse. Small animal nurses work mainly with cats and dogs but will also learn to care for smaller pets, such as guinea pigs and hamsters and sometimes more exotic animals like snakes and tortoises. Equine nurses mainly work with horses.

Tasks vary from one veterinary practice to another but usually include:

  • Holding and calming animals while a vet examines and treats them
  • Collecting blood, urine and other samples required for diagnosis and analysing these samples to gain results
  • Monitoring vital signs, such as temperature, heart rate and breathing rate and ensuring that patients receive appropriate care
  • Administering medication, giving injections and drugs to animals
  • Preparing animals for operations
  • Sterilising surgical instruments
  • Maintaining anaesthetic levels and assisting vets during operations
  • Wound management, changing the animals dressings
  • Taking x-rays and assisting vets perform other diagnostic imaging techniques such as using ultrasound imaging
  • Providing advice and guidance to the owners of the animals.

Veterinary Nurses also provide nursing care for animals staying on the premises for operations and treatment. This can include feeding the animals, providing fresh bedding and water, cleaning their accommodation and designing and implementing a nursing care plan to aid the patients' recovery.

Most Veterinary Nurses are involved in administration work such as managing appointments and keeping records of treatment. Others have more of a management role including preparing staff rotas, overseeing stocks of drugs and accounts work.

Many Veterinary Nurses will run nurse clinics providing a range of services including weight clinics, flea/worming treatments, post operative checks and suture removal, dental care and general advice on nutrition, grooming and many other areas.

Quite a large part of the veterinary nurse's work will include dealing directly with clients.

Working Conditions: 

Veterinary Nurses work around 35 to 40 hours a week. Work is usually on a rota basis, including some weekends and on-call emergency duties. Part-time work is often available.

In small animal practice most of the work is carried out indoors, in all areas of the veterinary practice, including the reception, treatment rooms and operating theatre. In some practices, it may be necessary to visit farms and zoos to treat animals.

Practices vary from spacious, modern animal centres and hospitals to small, individual practices run by one or two vets. Work in an equine practice will involve working in different areas including stable yards and clinical rooms. Work in areas where pets are staying can be noisy. There may also be parts of the job that include physical work such as lifting, moving animals and mucking out in stables.

The job may not be suitable for people with certain allergies.

Most employers provide uniforms and necessary protective clothing for the operating theatre and treatment work.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live:

  • Starting salaries are usually from around £12,000 a year
  • Experienced Veterinary Nurses may earn between £14,000 and £20,000
  • Senior Veterinary Nurses or Supervisors may earn up to £25,000 or more.

In some practices, benefits may include private health insurance or subsidised veterinary care. Accommodation may also be provided in some practices situated in rural areas.

Skills: 
  • Manage clinical environments
  • Manage the care of veterinary patients in accommodation
  • Provide support and advice to clients in caring for animals
  • Assist in administering and maintaining anaesthetics to animals
  • Prepare environment and equipment for veterinary surgical procedures
  • Assist the veterinary surgeon as a general theatre assistant during surgical procedures
  • Administer specialised nursing and treatments to veterinary patients
  • Conduct, and provide the results of, radiography on animals
  • Advise on the use of animal medicines and the prevention and control of disease in companion animals within the limits of a C-SQP
  • Discharge animals from care.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Able to use initiative
  • Good organisation skills
  • Good practical skills.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Veterinary Activities Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Veterinary Activities

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Veterinary Activities and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to have a:

  • Genuine interest in animals and their welfare
  • Strong commitment to providing the best possible animal care.

There are just over 8,000 Royal College of Veterinary Surgeons (RCVS) qualified Veterinary Nurses in the UK. The majority work for individually run veterinary practices. Jobs are also available in veterinary hospitals, animal welfare centres and colleges, for charities such as the People's Dispensary for Sick Animals (PDSA) and in some larger zoos and wildlife centres.

There is often strong competition for training positions.

Jobs may be advertised in local newspapers and specialist publications such as Veterinary Nursing Journal and Veterinary Record. The British Veterinary Nursing Association (BVNA) operates an employment register. This matches suitable candidates to vacancies in participating veterinary practices. The BVNA website has more details.

If you are looking to enter a career in Veterinary Nursing you will need to:

  • Be at least 16 years of age
  • Have a minimum of five GCSEs (grades A-C), including English, maths and a science. Alternative qualifications of a comparable or higher standard may be accepted
  • Be employed full time or part time in a RCVS approved training practice (TP). A list of TP's can be obtained from the RCVS website.

Colleges may recruit full-time students who then undertake clinical placements in veterinary practices.

Getting On: 

There may be promotion opportunities for experienced Registered Veterinary Nurses to Supervisor, Senior Practice Nurse or Manager. These are more likely in larger animal hospitals and practices.

Some Veterinary Nurses may choose to develop an interest in different aspects of animal health, such as behaviour or alternative therapy. Some may move into training, lecturing or become a veterinary drugs company representative.

Veterinary Nurses wishing to work overseas must check the suitability of their qualifications with the relevant countries' veterinary boards.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • RCVS Guide to Professional Conduct for Veterinary Nurses
  • Veterinary Nursing Journal
  • VeterTimes
  • So you want to work: with animals - Trotman
  • Real Life Guides: Working with animals veterinary Nursing Times
  • Veterinary Record
  • Veterinary and wildlife - Trotman
  • TP Times - The Veterinary Nurse Training Magazine.
A to Z: 

Harvesting Manager

Job Description: 

The role of a Forestry Harvesting Manager is mainly about the felling of trees and their preparation for transport and processing. 

The Harvesting Manager is responsible for the selection of suitable timber and planning of harvesting activities.

Working in private woodland or for the Forestry Commission will often require a wider range of skills and knowledge, including land management skills.  The Harvesting Manager will usually have to control a budget and follow a business plan developed for the sites they manage. 

They may be answerable in the first instance to the Head Forester, or land agent, who oversees the forestry work on a number of different locations.

A Forestry Harvesting Managers main task will be the planning the harvesting work to be carried out by staff and contractors. 

They may be required to survey and inspect trees and sites, selecting and marking up timber to be harvested, planning of harvesting activities and managing output of felled timber against set income targets.

Working Conditions: 

Although a Harvesting Manager is a management role, it can be physically demanding. Some of the time will be spent office-based but individuals should still be fit and able to work outdoors in all weathers.

Harvesting Managers typically work a standard full-time week. However, the hours may vary and weekend or Bank Holiday work can be required.

It is potentially hazardous work and may involve the use of power tools and heavy machinery. Protective clothing may need to be worn for certain tasks.

Depending on the area covered, there may be a significant amount of travelling between different sites. A driving license may be required. Occasional periods may be spent working away from home.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Experienced Forestry Workers may earn between £14000 and £24,000 a year
  • Self employed Forestry Contractors may earn up to £30,000 a year or more
  • Forestry Consultants can earn more than £30,000 a year depending on the employer and may also receive health benefits.
Skills: 
  • Business management
  • Work site safety and hazard recognition
  • Risk Assessment
  • Equipment use and maintenance
  • Machinery use and safety.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills (written and verbal)
  • Be able to plan and manage work have good organisational skills
  • Be practical and good at working with their hands
  • Be able to work safely
  • Be responsible, diligent and self-motivated
  • Enjoy working as part of a team but also confident working independently
  • Have good communication skills
  • Be able to plan and manage workloads
  • Be able to deal confidently and tactfully with others on a one-to-one or group basis
  • Responsible and aware of health and safety issues
  • Resourceful and mechanically minded.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Trees and Timber Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Trees and Timber

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Trees and Timber and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

The UK trees and timber industry employs around 22,500 people, many as Forest Workers.

The largest employer is the Forestry Commission. Private estates, local authorities, conservation organisations and charities, government agencies and forest management companies also employ Forest Workers. Most jobs are found in rural locations with large forested areas.

If you are interested in becoming a head forester it is important that you:

  • Enjoy working outside
  • Enjoy practical/physical work 
  • Be interested in the environment.

Lists of organisations, voluntary environmental projects and jobs are advertised on the Countryside Jobs Service website. Job vacancies are advertised in national and regional newspapers. 

The Forestry Commission publishes vacancies on its website and the Royal Forestry Society (RFS) lists vacancies in its Quarterly Journal of Forestry.

Getting On: 

As a Forest Manager progression will depend upon type of organization that you work for. 

Forest Managers may seek to become forestry consultants or move into a forestry contracting role.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • Chartered Forester - ICF
  • Forestry Journal
  • Horticulture Week
  • Quarterly Journal of Forestry - Royal Forestry Society.

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Vaccinator

Job Description: 

A Vaccinator’s role is to ensure that vaccinations can be administered to birds to prevent diseases occurring.  This can be by injecting birds using a syringe and needle or administered via the water supply and through particle spraying onto the birds.

A Vaccinator needs to be able to handle birds without causing stress and know where in the bird, and how to administer vaccines.

A vaccinator may work with various ages of birds, and various types of farms and systems e.g. with breeding poultry birds, with layers producing eggs for the food chain as well as with birds bred for meat.

Working Conditions: 

Vaccinators will generally work as least 39 hours per week, which may be in the form of shifts. Early mornings, evenings and weekend work are all common. There are also opportunities for part-time and casual work.

Most Vaccinators would work inside where birds are grouped and ready to be treated.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and the employee’s skills and experience.

A Vaccinator with experience may earn around £15,000 - £20,000 per year.

Skills: 
  • Monitor and maintain health, safety and security in the workplace
  • Maintain good standards of health and safety for self and others
  • Maintain environmental good practice at work
  • Receive and communicate information
  • Maintain and understand records
  • Assist in delivering basic treatment to livestock
  • Handle and restrain birds
  • Maintain personal hygiene
  • Maintain site biosecurity.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Timekeeping
  • Planning and preparation for work
  • Working alone
  • Attention to detail
  • Safety awareness
  • Flexibility.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To work in the poultry industry you will need to like handling and working in close proximity to birds, and enjoy working in teams.

New entrants or those with less than a years experience in the poultry meat industry would need to attend short training courses to ensure they are trained to the minimum standard as set by the British Poultry Training Initiative. 

It is the employer’s duty to provide the training as required in order to meet their farm assurance standards.

For more information about poultry careers visit the British Poultry Council

Getting On: 

Most vaccinators would work as a specialist for an independent company who contract to the poultry producers.

Due to the size and structure of the poultry industry there are many opportunities to progress and move between companies.

The British Poultry Training Initiative keeps a record of all the training completed, similar to a CV, called the Poultry Passport. This can be accessed and updated employees progress through the industry and between poultry industry employers.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found in the following websites and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • A Life on the Land
  • Scientific Farm Animal Production – Pearson Education
  • Farmers weekly
  • Farmers Guardian
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Workshop Foreman/Supervisor

Job Description: 

Similar to workshop manager, usually more hands on, and may spend some of their time working on machines, advising and supporting other members of workshop team and staff. Work with manufactures and machine suppliers.

The role includes managing staff, budgets and business department targets.

Work as part of the service team with management duties such as:

  • Organising jobs for staff and completing time sheets etc
  • Managing and mentoring staff
  • Carrying out appraisals with team members
  • Completing job cards and warranty claims
  • Writing up reports and records for completed work
  • Writing proposals for out of season servicing contracts.

Some workshop managers have to manage warranty claims as well as the staff and workshop. They manage budgets and resourses and make sure all customers requirements for service are covered and completed. They may also deal with stock control issues and negotiate with customers and their issues with service and debts.

Progression depends on the size of the business, whether it is a single or multi-branch.  In a single branch business, the Workshop Manager’s role could be more hands-on, whereas in a multi-branch business, the role could involve the supervision of Workshop foreman and supervisors as well as technicians.

Working Conditions: 

Workshop based, sometimes visiting customers on site or at farms to discuss service issues and resolve disputes.   

They will often manage staff making sure they are up to date with technical skills to do their job and arranging work with staff to develop their training plans and organise suitable training where identified.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Salary levels vary widely depending on experience and on the employing organisation. 

Workshop managers can expect to earn between £35,000- £40,000.

Skills: 
  • Be able to manage people
  • Be skills to at least a master technician level
  • Have a good level of experience within the workshop environment
  • Have a good understanding of product and services including parts
  • Be able to work to department targets and meet budgets
  • Be able to maintain environmental good practice
  • Be able to determine and propose customer requirements
  • Be able to dismantle and assemble components
  • Analyse and interpret test results
  • Be able to manage budgets.
Personal Qualities: 
  • A team player
  • A good organiser
  • Good communicator
  • Able to use own initiative.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Land-Based Engineering Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Land-Based Engineering

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Land-Based Engineering and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Promoted from the Workshop having completed an apprenticeship, or entering the business with a degree in Engineering, or from other industries, such as motor or heavy plant.

Getting On: 

Progress within the business or in other Engineering businesses to the role of Workshop Manager. 

There may also be opportunities to move into consultancy or set up a business of your own.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications

A to Z: 

Pages