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Welcome to Lantra's Job Finder.


Here you'll find a wide variety of roles in the land-based and environmental sector. There are roles throughout the UK in industries including agriculture, floristry, animal care and forestry. So get searching and find the job that's right for you!

To begin your search simply type in the key word to the job you are looking for, i.e. type ‘administrator’ in the search field.
 

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Around 150,000 people work in the land-based, aquaculture and environmental sector in Scotland, within around 24,000 businesses. Agriculture alone contributes more than one billion pounds to the country’s economy.

Over the next decade, 30,000 new entrants will be needed in the sector, so there are plenty of opportunities for exciting and rewarding careers out there.

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From chainsaws to tractor driving , groundcare to 4x4 driving, we have a course for you!

Discover the broad range of areas in which you can train by following the links on the left.

Unsure about the level or intensity of training suitable for you? Read more about the right course for you.  

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Horticultural Technician

Job Description: 

A Horticultural Technician is someone who has specialised in a specific area of horticulture, such as quality assurance, irrigation specialist, skilled spray operative, glasshouse specialist, soil specialist or part of a team working in laboratories.

Some of the things a Horticultural Technician could do:

  • Diagnose and deal authoritatively with verbal and written enquiries on plant disease
  • Check that produce meets required standards. This may be to meet legislation, customer requirements or a Quality Assurance scheme.
  • Manage irrigation systems
  • Manage environmental controls within a production environment.

Possible tasks:

  • Inspecting and testing produce
  • Identifying problems and finding solutions
  • Comparing with requirements
  • Checking measuring and testing equipment and plant quality
  • Making decisions on quality
  • Keeping records of results.
Working Conditions: 

Working hours will vary according to the exact nature of the job.

As you may have a role within an organisation but also classed as the specialist technician for a specific  area you may be called on at all hours to assist with problems with technical systems, so flexibility is key.

A driving licence is often required to travel between different places of work.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries can be around £15,500 - £19,500
  • Senior positions around £20,000 - £35,500.

Salaries for people working in private industry will vary considerably.

Skills: 

The skills will vary according to the specialist area of work.

Personal Qualities: 
  • Knowledge of science and plants
  • Accuracy and attention to detail
  • A methodical approach
  • Patience, perseverance and good concentration
  • Work well in a team and on his or her own initiative
  • Flexibility.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Horticulture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Horticulture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Horticulture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

For most Horticultural technicians you will have specialised in a certain area which interests you, for example quality assurance, irrigation, agronomy, seed science etc. 

So there are no formal routes into this particular career apart from specialising in a certain area

Getting On: 

Horticultural Technicians can progress to more senior positions within the organisation such as lead technician. 

Or you could take the specialism further and look at becoming an botanist, plant pathologist, agronomist etc.

Further Information: 

Horticultural Technicians can progress to more senior positions within the organisation such as lead technician. 

Or you could take the specialism further and look at becoming an botanist, plant pathologist, agronomist etc.

Horticultural Production Worker

Also known as: 

Fruit and Vegetable Worker; Glasshouse Production Worker; Plant Propagator; Nursery Worker.

Job Description: 

Horticulture Production Workers work in either food production or ornamental plant production/sales environment, producing plants in production areas, such as ornamental plant nurseries, fruit and vegetable production farms, cut flower grower farms, or on any farm or

site that produces plants.

Ornamental production of plants can include production for your local park to the shelves of the big garden centre chains, the trees, shrubs and flowers we all enjoy are grown at ornamental plant nurseries (an ornamental plant is one that looks good, but you can’t eat!).

Fruit and vegetable production; think of a greengrocer shop or supermarket aisle filled with British fruit and veg: you’d see apples, pears, plums, cherries, raspberries, strawberries, blackcurrants, carrots, potatoes, broccoli, salads, tomatoes, cucumbers, peppers, mushrooms, watercress…

They’re all grown by fruit and vegetable nurseries in the UK. The technology involved in growing edible plants plus the job opportunities from management to marketing make working on a fruit or veg nursery a rewarding career.  

Both areas of production may include either field production or protected production in glasshouses or plastic tunnels.

Horticultural Production Workers are likely to be involved in some of the following:

  • Growing plants, including sowing seeds, planting bulbs, cultivating cuttings and transferring the seedlings to pots and containers
  • Continuing to nurture plants by watering, weeding, pruning, and nutrient application
  • Identifying and dealing with pests and diseases
  • Maintaining horticultural tools, machinery and technical equipment
  • Identifying produce to be picked and packaged
  • Making sure the temperature, light and humidity in production area is at the optimum level
  • Working in teams to produce, pick and pack the final product
  • Customer service
  • Picking and packing of produce
  • Labelling of produce
  • Retailing of produce.

Some plant production centres can be quite large and have many different areas of work, where a variety of skills are required, such as production areas, garden centres and packhouse/dispatch areas.

The work can be challenging and affected by the weather and the changing seasons.

There are opportunities to progress to supervising a team of Horticultural Production Workers or specialise within a specific technical area such as irrigation specialist or soil specialist.

Working Conditions: 

The hours vary depending on the type of farm or production nursery and on the season. In large farms or nurseries staff may work a standard full-time week. In many businesses early starts are common in the summer months.

In both types of production businesses, weekend work, late evenings and overtime are common. There are also part-time and casual jobs available.

The work is rewarding and can be physically demanding. Workers may work inside or outside in all weather conditions. Protective clothing or a uniform is usually supplied.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live:

  • Starting salaries may be around £10,000 to £15,000 a year
  • With experience, Horticulture Production Workers may earn around £18,000 to £20,000
  • Those in supervisory or management roles may earn from around £20,000 to over £40,000 a year.
Skills: 
  • Be able to prepare sites for planting
  • Be able to prepare growing media
  • Be able to collect and store propagation material
  • Be able to propagate plants from seed
  • Be able to establish crops or plants
  • Be able to control the environmental conditions for protected crops
  • Be able to maintain the growth of crops or plants
  • Be able to harvest crops using varies means
  • Be able to complete post harvest operations, such as washing produce, trimming, grading, labelling etc.
  • Have good customer service skills.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Work in a team/with others
  • Work on your own
  • Time management
  • Self-motivated
  • Flexible working
  • Mobility.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Production Horticulture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Production Horticulture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Production Horticulture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are no formal entry requirements, but some employers ask for GCSEs (A*-C), especially in science subjects, or a Level 1 Award, Certificate or Diploma in Horticulture.

Customer service experience and skills are also important and some employers may also look for this type of previous experience or qualifications in retail and/or sales.

It may also be possible to enter this career as an assistant Horticultural Production Worker or through an appropriate Apprenticeship programme. Apprenticeships and Advanced Apprenticeships provide structured training with an employer and will pay at least £107 per week.

Getting On: 

Horticultural Production Workers could progress to supervisory positions where they supervise the work of teams of Production workers.

If you wish to specialise within a particular area such as irrigation, soil, nutrition etc., you could gain technical experience and qualifications within a specific area and become a Horticultural Production Technician/Specialist with certain areas of responsibility.

Different areas in the UK specialise in particular types of production depending on the climate and soil.

There is also a range of jobs outside the immediate area of growing. Supermarkets require field officers to manage the need for a daily supply of fresh produce.

There are also the suppliers, who provide everything from packaging to spray chemicals, who need specialist advisers and research workers to develop new products.

Vacancies are advertised directly, through the local or national press or company websites.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (Some may be priced):

  • Ranger Magazine
  • Countryside Magazine

Jobs

A to Z: 

Inspector

Also known as: 

RSPCA Inspector; SSPCA Inspector.

Job Description: 

Inspectors help prevent cruelty to animals by doing practical investigation work. They provide 24-hour cover for animals in need by responding to complaints about animal cruelty or neglect and reports of suffering wild animals.

 

The role of an Inspector can be hugely rewarding in terms of making a difference to animal welfare and education of the public. Following a complaint or call, an Inspector will go to the premises, for example a private home, farm, pet shop or kennel, to investigate. They meet the owner and check whether any animals are being mistreated or neglected. They may also talk to witnesses.

 

If their investigation shows neglect, the Inspector will advise owners on animal care, for example by discussing and explaining correct feeding methods or how to clean out living quarters. If the investigation shows evidence of cruelty, which is illegal behaviour, the Inspector will gather all evidence and remove the animal from the site. They will interview the owner and any witnesses and vets who have seen the animal. Statements are collected and sometimes photos or a video are taken at the scene.

 

A complete report of the cruelty investigation is sent to the RSPCA headquarters and a decision is made whether to issue a warning or take the matter to court.  An Inspector's report is vital in the decision-making process.

Inspectors also undertake wild animal rescue work. In towns this may involve helping to rescue an injured fox. In rural areas, a deer may be trapped in a ditch or a sheep on a cliff ledge. Once the animal is rescued, the Inspector then has to decide if it is strong enough to be released, if it needs medical treatment or if it must be put down humanely.

 

Another aspect of the work is educating the public about animal care and protection. This includes giving talks and presentations to schools, colleges, organisations and at special events. An Inspector may be interviewed for local radio or TV as part of a news item or on an animal care programme.

Inspectors work with a wide range of people including the general public, other Inspectors, the police, social services and dog wardens.

Working Conditions: 

Inspectors work 35 hours a week, Monday to Sunday on a rota basis. There may also be some on-call emergency duties.  Inspectors are normally based at home, receiving calls and doing paperwork. A lot of the work is outdoors in all weathers.

Lots of time is spent driving between different locations so a full driving licence is required.  The job may not be suitable for people with certain allergies.

This role can be intellectually, emotionally and physically demanding and will call on the experience, judgement and personal skills of the Inspector.

Inspection work can be dirty, muddy and involve unpleasant smells. Rescue work can be potentially dangerous and involve, for example, climbing trees or cliffs, entering ditches or flood water. Inspectors have to be prepared for some distressing sights.

A uniform is provided.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live:

RSPCA Inspector:

 

  • Starting salaries are usually £19,284
  • Fully-trained inspectors may earn around £21,00  to £27,000
  • The salary for a chief inspector starts at £27,869. 
 

Scottish SPCA Inspector:

 

  • A Probationary Inspector's salary is currently £17,00 - £19,000
  • A qualified Inspector's salary starts at £20,708.
Skills: 
  • Present evidence to court or other hearings
  • Implement plans to maintain animal health and well-being
  • Monitor and maintain the health, safety and security of the workplace
  • Establish and maintain effective working relationships with others
  • Collect and collate information relating to reported abuse or harm of animals
  • Present evidence against individuals alleged to have abused or harmed animals
  • Co-ordinate the care of animals that have been abused or harmed
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of animals
  • Restrain animals
  • Conduct interviews with suspects.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Dedicated
  • Caring
  • Genuine concern for animals
  • Able to cope with challenging and emotional situations
  • Able to communicate with a range of people professionally.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

You can no longer apply directly to the RSPCA to become an Inspector.  RSPCA Inspectors are recruited from the RSPCA’s Animal Welfare Officers. Information on current vacancies and recruitment can be found on the RSPCA website, www.rspca.org.uk.

 

To be an Inspector, you need to:

 

  • Care deeply about the welfare of animals
  • Have a strong interest in educating others about animal welfare.

The RSPCA currently employs approximately 330 Inspectors throughout England and Wales. There is strong competition for this role. Applicants for training with the RSPCA must:

  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Have at least five GCSEs grades (A*-C) or equivalent Qualifications
  • Be physically fit and able to swim 50 metres fully clothed
  • Interpersonal skills, preferably in controlling confrontational situations, are essential
  • Have a valid driving licence.
  •  

Previous experience of working with animals is desirable. Qualified Inspectors must be prepared to work anywhere in England and Wales although personal preferences may be taken into account where possible.

A conviction (or formal caution within the past 10 years) for a number of criminal offences will mean a definite or likely rejection of an application.

 

Scottish SPCA Inspector

Candidates should have a minimum of five standard grades, including English, and ideally a qualification in animal husbandry or science. Previous experience of working with large and small animals is valued as is a farming or veterinary background.   

Candidates are required to hold a full, preferably clean current UK driving licence and successful applicants will have to pass a medical examination and an Enhanced Disclosure Scotland check.

Getting On: 

This role provides a structured career path with opportunities for promotion to the rank of Chief Inspector and above for those Inspectors displaying the right aptitude and inclination.

 

Experienced Chief Inspectors may progress to become Regional Superintendent, work in training or in another management role.

There are sometimes opportunities to work overseas, training Inspectors in other countries or providing support in rescue operations following events such as oil spillages, floods or volcanic eruptions. 

Further Information: 

Further information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • BBC Wildlife Magazine
  • Cage and Aviary Birds
  • Fur and Feather
  • Here Comes Humanity Dick - Natula Publications
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Horse and Hound
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Your cat
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Jockey

Job Description: 

You would enter the industry as an Apprentice Jockey and work with a Jockey, Trainer or Owner to progress to become a Jockey after gaining the experience before becoming registered. 

A Jockey is a highly trained professional who will be contracted by a licensed trainer to ride their horses at public race meetings.  They may race either on the flat (on a race track without obstacles) or across jumps (known as National Hunt racing). Jockeys usually specialises in either flat or jump racing, although some take part in both. 

Work would include:

  • Planning racing strategies with the owner and trainer
  • Taking advice from the trainer on tactics to suit the horse and the track
  • Riding every day to train and exercise the horses 
  • Riding at flat or jump races at race tracks around the UK.
Working Conditions: 

A Jockey would work around 40 to 45 hours a week depending on the number of races they take part in. There will be a significant amount of travelling involved as jockeys are required to attend races at courses throughout the UK. 

The work is physically demanding, often involving early starts and late finishes.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from town; sometimes in quite remote areas. Therefore a driving licence may be useful.

There is high risk of injury from falls and kicks when working around horses so it important to ensure you are protected therefore Jockeys should wear suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including riding boots, waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat when riding.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

A Jockey will receive a riding fee and a percentage of any prize money won. It may also be possible for some Jockeys to secure a sponsorship deals.

Skills: 
  • Identifying, planning and setting programmes to improve your technical skills, physical capabilities and sporting commitments
  • Recognise signs of equine illness and deliver basic health care treatment to horses
  • Introduce young horses to equipment for the schooling of racehorses
  • Ride racehorses to improve performance
  • Assist with designing training programmes for racehorses
  • A high level of skill in riding and handling horses
  • Maintaining the health and well being of equines.
Personal Qualities: 
  • The ability to work well with others
  • Good eyesight and fast reaction speeds
  • Determination and dedication
  • Fitness, strength and stamina.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Jockeys usually start off working as a stable hand (also known as groom), work rider or as an apprentice, doing tasks like filling hay nets, sweeping the yard, mucking out stables, grooming, feeding and watering horses, and taking horses through exercises.

A Jockey’s weight limit is about 9 stone 7lbs as a Jump Jockey and about 8 stone as a Flat Jockey.

The first step to become a Professional Jockey is to become employed on a racing yard as an Apprentice (flat racing) or Conditional Jockey (Jump Racing) and then attend many training courses in the process.

An Apprentice or Conditional Jockey receives training on the job. The trainer is responsible for choosing suitable horses to ride and deciding when apprentice/Conditional Jockeys are competent and ready to race (usually after about two years).

Apprentice /Conditional Jockeys then apply to the British Horseracing Authority for a license to ride. This includes a 5-day residential Apprentice or Conditional License course and a medical at the BRS in Newmarket or the NRC in Doncaster. 

Once the license, is awarded, an apprentice or Conditional Jockey would complete the Apprenticeship at the trainer's yard. You would usually do this between the ages of 16 and 25 (27 for racing over jumps), after which you can become a Professional Jockey.

To keep the license, Jockeys then need to continue their development by taking a 4-day Apprentice or Conditional Continuation course and an advanced Apprentice or Conditional course.

Getting On: 

There are more than 550 racing stables around the country, mainly in rural areas. Employment prospects for trained stable hands are usually good but progression to apprentice Jockey is difficult and becoming a successful Professional Jockey even more so.

A Professional Jockey may work for one trainer or owner, or ride for different trainers and owners as a self-employed jockey. There are opportunities to work for stables overseas, especially in Dubai, Japan and the USA.

Jockeys usually retire from riding by age 45 (35 for jump jockeys). At the end of the racing career, Jockeys can get advice on retraining and employment from the Jockeys Employment and Training Scheme.

Further Information: 

Additional information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced): 

  • The Racing Post
  • Racing Ahead
  • Horse and Hound.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

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