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Animal Care

Beginning Falconry Award

Lantra is pleased to confirm it is still offering the increasingly-popular Beginning Falconry Award. Delivered by a network of training providers across the UK, the Award continues to attract learners in areas including further education, prison rehabilitation and animal husbandry.

Developed by Lantra Awards in conjunction with the Hawk Board, the Beginning Falconry Award is ideal for those who are new to falconry, or those who wish to keep raptors and/or owls.

Inspector

Also known as: 

RSPCA Inspector; SSPCA Inspector.

Job Description: 

Inspectors help prevent cruelty to animals by doing practical investigation work. They provide 24-hour cover for animals in need by responding to complaints about animal cruelty or neglect and reports of suffering wild animals.

 

The role of an Inspector can be hugely rewarding in terms of making a difference to animal welfare and education of the public. Following a complaint or call, an Inspector will go to the premises, for example a private home, farm, pet shop or kennel, to investigate. They meet the owner and check whether any animals are being mistreated or neglected. They may also talk to witnesses.

 

If their investigation shows neglect, the Inspector will advise owners on animal care, for example by discussing and explaining correct feeding methods or how to clean out living quarters. If the investigation shows evidence of cruelty, which is illegal behaviour, the Inspector will gather all evidence and remove the animal from the site. They will interview the owner and any witnesses and vets who have seen the animal. Statements are collected and sometimes photos or a video are taken at the scene.

 

A complete report of the cruelty investigation is sent to the RSPCA headquarters and a decision is made whether to issue a warning or take the matter to court.  An Inspector's report is vital in the decision-making process.

Inspectors also undertake wild animal rescue work. In towns this may involve helping to rescue an injured fox. In rural areas, a deer may be trapped in a ditch or a sheep on a cliff ledge. Once the animal is rescued, the Inspector then has to decide if it is strong enough to be released, if it needs medical treatment or if it must be put down humanely.

 

Another aspect of the work is educating the public about animal care and protection. This includes giving talks and presentations to schools, colleges, organisations and at special events. An Inspector may be interviewed for local radio or TV as part of a news item or on an animal care programme.

Inspectors work with a wide range of people including the general public, other Inspectors, the police, social services and dog wardens.

Working Conditions: 

Inspectors work 35 hours a week, Monday to Sunday on a rota basis. There may also be some on-call emergency duties.  Inspectors are normally based at home, receiving calls and doing paperwork. A lot of the work is outdoors in all weathers.

Lots of time is spent driving between different locations so a full driving licence is required.  The job may not be suitable for people with certain allergies.

This role can be intellectually, emotionally and physically demanding and will call on the experience, judgement and personal skills of the Inspector.

Inspection work can be dirty, muddy and involve unpleasant smells. Rescue work can be potentially dangerous and involve, for example, climbing trees or cliffs, entering ditches or flood water. Inspectors have to be prepared for some distressing sights.

A uniform is provided.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live:

RSPCA Inspector:

 

  • Starting salaries are usually £19,284
  • Fully-trained inspectors may earn around £21,00  to £27,000
  • The salary for a chief inspector starts at £27,869. 
 

Scottish SPCA Inspector:

 

  • A Probationary Inspector's salary is currently £17,00 - £19,000
  • A qualified Inspector's salary starts at £20,708.
Skills: 
  • Present evidence to court or other hearings
  • Implement plans to maintain animal health and well-being
  • Monitor and maintain the health, safety and security of the workplace
  • Establish and maintain effective working relationships with others
  • Collect and collate information relating to reported abuse or harm of animals
  • Present evidence against individuals alleged to have abused or harmed animals
  • Co-ordinate the care of animals that have been abused or harmed
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of animals
  • Restrain animals
  • Conduct interviews with suspects.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Dedicated
  • Caring
  • Genuine concern for animals
  • Able to cope with challenging and emotional situations
  • Able to communicate with a range of people professionally.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

You can no longer apply directly to the RSPCA to become an Inspector.  RSPCA Inspectors are recruited from the RSPCA’s Animal Welfare Officers. Information on current vacancies and recruitment can be found on the RSPCA website, www.rspca.org.uk.

 

To be an Inspector, you need to:

 

  • Care deeply about the welfare of animals
  • Have a strong interest in educating others about animal welfare.

The RSPCA currently employs approximately 330 Inspectors throughout England and Wales. There is strong competition for this role. Applicants for training with the RSPCA must:

  • Be at least 18 years of age
  • Have at least five GCSEs grades (A*-C) or equivalent Qualifications
  • Be physically fit and able to swim 50 metres fully clothed
  • Interpersonal skills, preferably in controlling confrontational situations, are essential
  • Have a valid driving licence.
  •  

Previous experience of working with animals is desirable. Qualified Inspectors must be prepared to work anywhere in England and Wales although personal preferences may be taken into account where possible.

A conviction (or formal caution within the past 10 years) for a number of criminal offences will mean a definite or likely rejection of an application.

 

Scottish SPCA Inspector

Candidates should have a minimum of five standard grades, including English, and ideally a qualification in animal husbandry or science. Previous experience of working with large and small animals is valued as is a farming or veterinary background.   

Candidates are required to hold a full, preferably clean current UK driving licence and successful applicants will have to pass a medical examination and an Enhanced Disclosure Scotland check.

Getting On: 

This role provides a structured career path with opportunities for promotion to the rank of Chief Inspector and above for those Inspectors displaying the right aptitude and inclination.

 

Experienced Chief Inspectors may progress to become Regional Superintendent, work in training or in another management role.

There are sometimes opportunities to work overseas, training Inspectors in other countries or providing support in rescue operations following events such as oil spillages, floods or volcanic eruptions. 

Further Information: 

Further information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • BBC Wildlife Magazine
  • Cage and Aviary Birds
  • Fur and Feather
  • Here Comes Humanity Dick - Natula Publications
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Horse and Hound
  • Farmers Weekly
  • Your cat
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Pet Shop Manager

Also known as: 

Pet shop retail manager.

Job Description: 

Pet Shop Manager work in retail outlets caring for live animals and selling them as pets and companion animals. The Pet Shop Manager will have responsibility for the running of the business as well as supervising and managing others.

The most common pets on sale are fish (many outlets specialise only in fish) followed by small animals such as mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils and sometimes birds. A few stores offer more exotic pets such as snakes, lizards, large spiders and insects. Although cats and dogs are the most common household pets.

Pet stores also sell cages, aquaria, treatments, equipment, treats and accessories, as well as pet food. Some shops sell live food, such as locusts.

The work of a Pet Shop Manager may include:

  • Dealing with a range of customer enquiries about animal care, welfare and pet selection
  • Serving customers and taking payment for goods
  • Recruiting and selecting staff
  • Managing budgets.
Working Conditions: 

Full-time Pet Shop Managers usually work around 40 hours a week, sometimes including weekends and evenings.

 

They work in shops and other retail outlets. The work is mostly indoors, although coldwater fish, for example, can be kept outdoors. When working with a fish tank the hands and arms may be submerged in water for long periods. A protective apron or overall is often worn. A uniform is sometimes provided.

 

Pet Shop Managers spend a lot of time on their feet. The work may involve some heavy lifting and climbing up on stepladders.

The job could be unsuitable for those allergic to fur or feathers.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

The starting salary for a Pet Shop Manager may be around £24,500 - £30,000 a year.

Skills: 
  • Handle payments from clients
  • Assist in the sale of medicines and treatments for animals
  • Manage the maintenance of animal accommodation
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of animals
  • Price products and services
  • Interview and select candidates
  • Improve sales and marketing
  • Enhance performance through development of self, individuals and teams
  • Plan, supervise and control the movement of animals
  • Communicate information to customers
  • Maintaining stock levels.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Attention to detail
  • Good organisation skills.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Experience of working in a retail environment and with a wide range of animals will be useful. 

Most Pel Shop Managers will need to have qualifications to a minimum of level 3 although some may have progressed through the business gaining relevant training and qualifications.

There are apprenticeships available which will also provide a route into the career of a Pet Sop Manager.

Getting On: 

Pet Shop Managers may progress onto business owners or Retail Store Mangers where there are opportunities in large retail outlets.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • Pet Business World
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Fur and Feather
  • Cage And Aviary Birds Magazine
  • Koi Magazine
  • Parrots Magazine
  • Careers Working with Animals - Kogan Page
  • Grooming Manual for the Dog and Cat - Blackwell
  • Understanding Animal Welfare - Wiley Blackwell
  • So you want to work: with animals - Trotman
  • Real Life Guides: Working with animals and wildlife - Trotman
  • Practical Fish Keeping
  • Dog World
  • Dog Today
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Pet Shop Assistant

Also known as: 

Pet retail assistant

Job Description: 

Pet Retail Assistants work in retail outlets caring for live animals and selling them as pets and companion animals.

The most common pets on sale are fish (many outlets specialise only in fish) followed by small animals such as mice, rats, guinea pigs, rabbits, hamsters, gerbils and sometimes birds. A few stores offer more exotic pets such as snakes, lizards, large spiders and insects. Although cats and dogs are the most common household pets, only a small percentage of retail outlets actually sell puppies or kittens.

Pet stores also sell cages, aquaria, treatments, equipment, treats and accessories, as well as pet food. Some shops sell live food, such as locusts.

The work of a Pet Retail Assistant may include:

  • dealing with a range of customer enquiries about animal care, welfare and pet selection
  • keeping the store clean and tidy, and helping with unloading deliveries, shelf-filling and pricing
  • feeding and providing water to the animals cleaning out cages: changing substrate and bedding, removing faeces and other soiled material
  • cleaning out fish tanks: scraping algae off the sides, removing dead fish or plants, resetting new plants, siphoning off dirty water and refilling the tanks, changing filter material and unblocking tubes
  • checking the water temperature and chemical balance in fish tanks, including salt water tanks containing marine fish
  • catching one particular fish from a group in a tank and transferring it by net to a plastic bag or other receptacle
  • checking the fish and all of the other animals regularly for signs of disease and, if necessary, take them to a veterinary surgeon
  • catching and handling birds and animals in the correct way and transferring them to carrying boxes (they move very quickly and may bite if frightened)
  • exercising and grooming animals if necessary
  • serving customers and taking payment for goods
Working Conditions: 

Full-time Pet Retail Assistants usually work around 39 hours a week, sometimes including weekends and evenings. Many Pet Retail Assistants work part-time.

They work in shops and other retail outlets. The work is mostly indoors, although coldwater fish, for example, can be kept outdoors. When working with a fish tank the hands and arms may be submerged for long periods. A protective apron or overall is often worn. A uniform is sometimes provided.

Pet Retail Assistants spend a lot of time on their feet. The work may involve some heavy lifting and climbing up on stepladders.

The job could be unsuitable for those allergic to fur or feathers.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • the starting salary for a Pet Retail Assistant may be around £11,500 a year
  • an experienced Assistant may earn up to £12,500, or more
  • Assistant Managers of pet shops may earn £16,500 a year, or more
Skills: 
  • Handle payments from clients
  • Assist in the sale of medicines and treatments for animals
  • Provide exercise opportunities for animals
  • Groom animals
  • Assist with maintaining animal accommodation
  • Handle animals
  • Provide feed and water to animals
  • Deliver basic treatments to animals under supervision
  • Unload animals and establish them in their new environment
  • Restrain animals
Personal Qualities: 
  • Team player
  • Conscientious
  • Reliable
  • Good communication skills
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

In the UK there are some 3,200 pet shops. Pet Retail Assistants work in shops on the High Street or in shopping malls, in pet departments within garden centres and in pet superstores. Many retailers are based in towns and cities, or large out-of-town shopping centres. Jobs are available throughout the UK.

Pet ownership is growing and working with animals is a popular choice, so there can be competition for vacancies. However, there is a demand for trained assistants in the growth area of retailing aquatic plants and fish.

No formal academic qualifications are required to work as a Pet Retail Assistant. However, many employers expect applicants to have either paid or unpaid experience in caring for animals. It may therefore be beneficial to gain experience through volunteering.

It may also be possible to enter this career through an Apprenticeship scheme.

Large retailers may advertise jobs on their own websites. Vacancies may be advertised in local newspapers.

Getting On: 

Promotion to supervisory and then managerial roles may be possible. Opportunities for progression may be greater in larger organisations.

Courses relevant to getting into a managerial role include the NPTC Level 3 Advanced Certificate in Pet Store Management. This is available at some colleges, or from the Pet Care Trust which offers a distance learning course.

Some, particularly those who have studied to the level of HNC, HND or degree in areas such as animal care, animal welfare or animal behaviour, may move into specialised areas of working with animals.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Publications, Magazines and Journals (Some may be priced):

  • Pet Business World
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Fur and Feather
  • Cage And Aviary Birds Magazine
  • Koi Magazine
  • Parrots Magazine
  • Careers Working with Animals - Kogan Page
  • Grooming Manual for the Dog and Cat - Blackwell
  • Understanding Animal Welfare - Wiley Blackwell
  • So you want to work: with animals - Trotman
  • Real Life Guides: Working with animals and wildlife - Trotman
  • Practical Fish Keeping
  • Dog World
  • Dog Today
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Zoo / Animal Keeper

Also known as: 

Animal Keeper; Safari Park Ranger.

Job Description: 

Zoo Keepers are responsible for the day-to-day care and welfare of animals in a zoo, wildlife/safari park, aquarium or special collection. Keepers may work with a wide range of animals from mammals and birds to reptiles and amphibians to fish and invertebrates. Many Keepers become highly specialised and concentrate and work with one type of animal. They make sure that animals are physically and psychologically healthy.

In wildlife parks, where animals live in conditions similar to the wild, Keepers have less contact with them but observation of their behaviour and knowledge of their routine is important. Zoo Keepers must be excellent observers, learning habits and behaviours of both individual animals and groups.

They must be able to detect subtle changes in an animal’s physical or psychological condition and then react accordingly.

Keepers use a range of equipment including shovels, brooms, hoses, animal restraint equipment and vehicles. They may work alone or as part of a team for some tasks.

Working Conditions: 

A Zoo Keeper’s typical working week is 37.5 to 40 hours, and overtime may be available. Part-time and seasonal work may be available with some employers. Animals must be cared for every day of the year, so Keepers work on a rota to cover all periods to include weekends and bank holidays. During the spring and summer the hours worked may be longer and a shift system may be in place. Senior Keepers may be on a call-out rota which could include evenings.

The work is generally physically demanding. Zoo Keepers may work outside or indoors, depending on the type of animals they care for. As a lot of time may be spent outside, conditions may be wet, cold, dirty, muddy, smelly, hot or humid. Keepers wear a uniform, normally an overall, supplied by their employer.

People with allergies to some kinds of plants and to fur may find the work unsuitable.

For those Keepers working in a safari park a driving licence may be required.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • The starting salary may be around £10,500 - £13,000 a year
  • Experienced Keepers may earn £17,000 a year
  • A Head Keeper may earn about from £17,000 to £24,000 a year.

Free or subsidised accommodation may also be available with some posts.

Skills: 
  • Cleaning animal enclosures and providing fresh bedding
  • Feeding and providing water to animals, including ‘live feed’, such as locusts and mealworms, or ‘dead feed’, such as rats or day-old chicks
  • Monitoring accommodation conditions, such as temperature and humidity
  • Observing animals for signs of injury, distress, illness or pregnancy
  • Keeping daily healthcare records in a diary or, normally, on a computer
  • Helping to run breeding programmes, including hand-rearing young animals when necessary
  • Loading and unloading animals for transport
  • Making sure animals are kept within their enclosures
  • Answering visitors’ questions
  • Preparing and delivering educational talks, presentations or guided tours to children or adults
  • Looking after visitors, and making sure they do not feed or upset the animals, or, especially in wildlife parks, put themselves in danger by approaching animals too closely
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Good organisation skills
  • Able to work in teams.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Zoo Keepers need to be interested in:

  • Animals, but not be sentimental about them
  • Animal biology and psychology
  • Animals' natural habitats and habits, and zoos in general.

Most zoos require previous relevant experience. Volunteering experience is extremely valuable and many zoos offer a volunteer programme. However, relatively few volunteers have direct contact with the animals. Volunteer schemes are popular, and there may be a waiting list.

Another way to gain suitable experience might be by doing voluntary or paid work in a pet shop, stable, kennel or farm, or by taking an animal care course at college.

Zoos vary in the minimum educational qualifications they require:

  • Many require three to five GCSEs grades (A-C), or the equivalent. English, maths and a science subject may be specified
  • An Level 2 Certificate in Animal Care
  • A few zoos require higher qualifications such as A levels, a BTEC level 3l Award, Certificate or Diploma in Animal Management
  • Diplomas in Work-based in Animal Care (previous NVQ title) are available at Levels 2 to 3, and in Animal Care and Management at Level 4.
  • Some entrants have HNDs or degrees in subjects such as animal management or zoology
  • These jobs are very popular and competition for advertised vacancies is high, therefore any qualifications in this area gained above GCSE level would be beneficial to applicants
  • To work with children or vulnerable adults, applicants may need to undergo checks through the Criminal Records Bureau.

There are Apprenticeships in Animal Care available which will provide entry into a career in zoos and you may well be employed as an Assistant Zoo / Animal Keeper progressing onto the Zoo / Animal Keeper on completion of the apprenticeship.

Zoo Keepers work at zoos, safari/wildlife parks, bird collections and aquariums throughout the UK. There are about 350 such places run by zoological societies, charitable trusts, local authorities or private businesses.

Getting On: 

In larger zoos there may be prospects of promotion to Senior Keeper and eventually to Head Keeper.  Generally, however, finding work with more responsibilities may mean moving to another zoo.

Some Keepers move into related areas of work, such as RSPCA inspector.

There may be some opportunities to work abroad.

Further Information: 

You can find further information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Some of the larger zoos and wildlife parks may be able to offer information about zoo keeping.

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • Nature magazine
  • New Scientist magazine
  • BBC Wildlife
  • Real Life Guide to Working with Animals and Wildlife - Trotman
  • So You Want to Work with Animals? - Trotman
  • Careers Working with Animals - Kogan Page

Jobs

Zoology jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Dog Warden

Also known as: 

Animal Welfare Officer; Animal Control Officer

Job Description: 

A Dog Warden will work with a variety of people to raise awareness of the Animal Welfare Act and encourage responsible animal ownership. Dog Wardens work with a range of companion animals but most commonly with dogs and dog owners.

Dog Wardens will work with other welfare organisations to improve the standards of care and welfare for companion animals. (source: Cave)

Most Wardens work for local authorities as part of their response to the Animal Welfare Act. In some authorities Animal Welfare Officers have replaced Dog Wardens and have a more diverse role.

Dog Wardens:

  • Deal with stray dogs
  • Enforce dog related legislation
  • Promote of responsible dog ownership
  • Deal with dog fouling
  • Deal with noise pollution caused by dogs
  • Educate dog owners and the public
  • Liaise and work alongside other agencies
  • Enforce the environmental protection act 1990 that deals with stray dogs.
Working Conditions: 

Most Dog Wardens work for local authorities as part of their response to the Animal Welfare Act. In some authorities Animal Welfare Officers have replaced Dog Wardens and have a more diverse role.

Working conditions are varied and will include physical, outdoor work in all weather conditions. Dog Wardens will also have some office based roles, including administration and meetings with the public and other organisations.

Although rewarding, the role may involve working with animals in distress and those showing aggression, and dealing with members of the public in potentially challenging situations.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries for Dog Wardens are usually in line with the national minimum wage
  • Experienced Dog Warden may earn between £20,000 - £23,500 per year.
Skills: 
  • Deal with stray dogs
  • Enforce dog related legislation
  • Promote of responsible dog ownership
  • Deal with noise pollution caused by dogs
  • Educate dog owners and the public
  • Liaise and work alongside other agencies
  • Assess the suitability of new environments
  • Identify hazards and risks.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Adaptable and flexible
  • Able to use initiative
  • Able to work on own and in teams.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Although there is no set entry requirements, a good general level of education is required. This includes qualifications equivalent to 5 GCSE's with good standards of literacy, numeracy and IT skills.

A full, clean driving licence will be essential.

Experience of handling animals, particularly dogs will be an advantage.

Getting On: 

Opportunities for career progression vary with local authority employers but may include progression to a supervisory role and the option to study for qualifications including:

  • CIEH Level 2 Award in Environmental Principles and Best Practice
  • CIEH Environmental Management Certificate.
Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • VN Times
  • Your Dog
  • Your Cat
  • Horse and Hound
  • Fur and Feather
  • Pet Business World
  • Dogs Today
  • Dog World
  • Teaching Dogs.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Dog Handler (Uniformed)

Job Description: 

Dog Handlers work with dogs to help prevent and detect crime or to find lost and missing people.

A Dog Handler and their dog train for a specific purpose. Various organisations use working dogs, such as:

  • The police
  • HM Revenue and Customs
  • The armed forces
  • Fire and rescue services
  • Prisons
  • Private security firms.

In the police force dogs are used in several different ways:

  • General purpose - tracking offenders by following a scent trail left on the ground; searching for people in buildings or open areas; searching for hidden, lost or stolen property; chasing and detaining offenders; and protecting their handlers and others in dangerous situations
  • As guard or patrol dogs
  • Controlling crowds, for example at football matches
  • Searching for weapons, drugs and money
  • Locating dead bodies and blood, either buried or on the surface - for instance in aircraft or rail accidents.

HM Revenue and Customs use dogs at ports, airports and large stations for:

  • Detecting drugs, tobacco, cigarettes and money
  • Detecting foods such as honey, meat, fish and dairy products that are brought into the country illegally.

Dogs are used in the Army and the Royal Air Force (RAF) for operations in the UK and abroad:

  • Protection – camp security
  • Detection - searching routes, areas, vehicles and buildings for arms, explosives and drugs.

In the fire and rescue services dogs have three main purposes:

  • Helping in Urban Search and Rescue (USAR) operations in the UK and overseas (they are used particularly to find people who may be in collapsed buildings)
  • Helping to search in the UK for missing, lost and injured people
  • Finding where an accelerant has been used in an arson attack to help the fire to take hold.

In the prison services dogs have several purposes:

  • Patrolling the perimeters of prisons to deter intruders
  • Searching inside prisons for drugs, weapons and explosives
  • Checking visitors to prisons for illegal drugs, weapons and explosives.

Private security organisations use dogs for:

  • Patrolling and guarding property to deter damage and criminal activity
  • Personal protection and handler defence
  • Security at building sites and events
  • Detecting drugs and explosives.

In working with their dogs, Handlers use a series of commands and signals to indicate what they want the dog to do. Both Handler and dog will have learnt these skills during training.

Many working dogs live with their Handlers. In these cases, Handlers are responsible for exercising, feeding and grooming them. Handlers also transport their dogs to and from work. In many cases, when dogs are retired from work they continue to live with their Handlers and the Handler’s family.

Working Conditions: 

Hours of work vary between organisations. They can be long and variable including evenings, nights and weekends. Self-employed handlers tend to work longer hours.

Dog Handlers in the armed forces may be posted overseas.

Dog handling involves periods of standing, usually a lot of walking and sometimes running. Most of the work is outdoors in all kinds of weather conditions.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

The following figures are for dog handlers in private security, who are usually paid an hourly rate:

  • Dog Handlers may start on at least £15,000 a year
  • Experienced Dog Handlers and specialist Dog Handlers, for example those with dogs that can detect drugs, may earn around £20,000 a year
  • Some may earn up to £25,000 a year.

Dog Handlers in the police, HM Revenue and Customs, the armed forces, fire and rescue services and prison services are on the salary scales of their organisations.

Skills: 
  • Be able to develop a good working relationship with their dog
  • Know how to care for their dog’s needs
  • Be physically active, as some handlers can walk many miles in a day
  • Maintain good working practices
  • Maintain records
  • Liaise with different people
  • Be able to assess situations and make judgements.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Be able to work independently and unsupervised
  • Work well as part of a team
  • Have good communication skills
  • Be reliable
  • Have patience
  • Be self-confident.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to:

  • Have a passionate interest in dogs, including their care, behaviour and welfare
  • Enjoy working with people.

Dog Handlers are employed throughout the UK. Employers include:

  • Police forces, including the Ministry of Defence Police
  • HM Revenue and Customs
  • Fire and rescue services
  • The armed forces
  • Prison services
  • Industrial and commercial companies
  • Private security companies.

Many Dog Handlers in private security are self-employed and are hired by security companies.

The number of private security Dog Handlers has grown in recent years and there is considerable demand for them.

Both The National Association of Security Dog Users (NASDU) and the National Training Inspectorate for Professional Dog Users (NTIPDU) keep registers of Dog Handlers looking for work and tell Handlers on their registers when vacancies are available. However, most Handlers tend to approach local security firms to find work.

Entry routes

Some organisations, such as police forces, HM Revenue and Customs, fire and rescue services and prison services, only accept applications for dog handling from people who already work for them.

For general information about joining these organisations, see Police Officer, Civil Service Executive Officer, Firefighter/ Firefighting Manager, and Prison Officer.

While the armed forces do not specify any qualifications, many applicants have some GCSEs including English and maths. Applicants must pass an entrance test, interviews and physical and medical tests. For information on joining the Army or RAF, see Army Soldier or Royal Air Force (RAF) Airman/woman.

To work as a Dog Handler in private security it is not necessary to have academic qualifications. However, most types of security guards, including Dog Handlers, in England are legally required to have a Security Industry Authority (SIA) licence. To get a licence security guards must:

  • Attend an approved training course
  • Gain a nationally-recognised qualification
  • Undergo identity checks and criminal record checks.

Employers in private security firms look for people with experience of working with dogs. A self-employed handler needs a dog that has been trained to work with them and their own vehicle to transport the dog.

Both NASDU and NTIPDU recommend that people who want to become dog handlers should first gain experience as security officers.

People who have general security officer experience and an SIA licence may train for the EDI Level 2 National Award for general purpose security dog handlers.

Getting On: 

Employment with the Police or Armed Services may offer progression into the specialised training related to being a dog trainer. There are opportunities for promotion in the police, HM Revenue and Customs, the armed forces, fire and rescue services and prison services.

Dog handlers in private security may become supervisors or managers. They may also set up their own security firms.

Some experienced dog handlers go into security dog training.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines/journals (Some may be priced):

  • Dog Training Weekly
  • Dog World
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Teaching Dogs
  • Our Dogs
  • Animal Behaviour – ASAB
  • Real Life Guide to Working with Animals and Wildlife - Trotman
  • Working with Animals - Vacation Work.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Dog / Animal Groomer Manager

Job Description: 

Although the majority of animal grooming involves the care of dogs, the industry has grown and become much more diverse. It now also includes grooming services for other animals such as cats and rabbits.

Working as an Animal Groomer can be very rewarding as grooming can prevent and alleviate suffering.

An Animal Grooming Manager will have responsibility for the running of the business as well as supervising and managing others.

Animal Grooming Manager start by discussing with the animal's owner what type of grooming is needed. They then follow guidelines on how each different animal should look and trim the animal accordingly.

An Animal Grooming Managers tasks usually include:

  • Parting the animal's hair to check the skin for ticks, fleas, red, sore or inflamed areas and any lumps
  • Checking eyes, ears, mouth, nose, feet and nails
  • Shampooing and drying, using specialist hairdryers or drying cabinets
  • Brushing or combing to get rid of tangles
  • Trimming into the right shape for its breed, using electric clippers or a stripping knife
  • Styling with scissors
  • Final brushing, combing and trimming.
Working Conditions: 

Animal Grooming Managers usually work a standard full-time week, Monday to Saturday, with a day off during the week.

Self-employed Animal Grooming Managers often work flexible hours, including evenings and weekends, to meet the needs of their clients. Grooming animals, such as dogs, can take up to two hours for each animal

Animal Grooming Managers mainly work indoors, in a private home, shop, veterinary practice or grooming room. A driving licence is useful for groomers who travel between different places of work.

There is a considerable amount of standing involved and lifting of animals onto the grooming table. The work can be dusty and hairy, and may not be suitable for some people with allergies.

Most Animal Grooming Managers wear an overall or apron for shampooing and gloves if using chemicals to treat parasites or skin conditions.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live:

  • A person starting out as a Groomer may earn around £11,000 a year
  • Experienced Groomers caring for dogs may earn £16,000 or more
  • Very experienced Groomers, Managers or Supervisors of grooming businesses may earn around £20,000 or more.

Self-employed Animal Grooming Managers usually charge set or negotiated fees per hour or appointment. The charge may vary according to the size of the animal being groomed and the work that is involved.

Skills: 
  • Groom animals
  • Promote and maintain the health and well-being of animals
  • Handle animals
  • Price products and services
  • Interview and select candidates
  • Improve sales and marketing
  • Plan to improve your sales and marketing
  • Enhance performance through development of self, individuals and teams
  • Plan, supervise and control the movement of animals
  • Communicate information to customers.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Attention to detail
  • Good organisation skills.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Experience of grooming a wide range of breeds and animals to a high standard is considered essential to become an Animal Grooming Manager.

Experience of running a business and customer care are also very important.

Getting On: 

Many experienced Animal Grooming Managers start up their own grooming business. Some move into lecturing or training in animal grooming or move into other areas of work with animals.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found in the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • Our Dogs and Dog World
  • Dog World
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Pet Business World
  • Your Cat
  • Fur and Feather
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Dog / Animal Groomer

Job Description: 

Although the majority of animal grooming involves the care of dogs, the industry has grown and become much more diverse. It now also includes grooming services for other animals such as cats and rabbits. Working as an Animal Groomer can be very rewarding as grooming can prevent and alleviate suffering.

Dog Groomers look after the conditions of dogs’ coats by shampooing, clipping, trimming and grooming them. They may also check the animals’ skin, eyes, ears, mouth, nose, feet and nails for any problems.

This career will involve working with a variety of breeds and sizes. Some dogs are groomed as regularly as every four to six weeks, others perhaps once or twice a year.

Dog Groomers start by discussing with the animal’s owner what type of grooming is needed. They then follow guidelines on how each different animal should look, and trim the animal accordingly.

All Animal Groomers need to take special care when clipping. For dogs, this is especially important around the face, legs and paws. Grooming dogs may sometimes involve clipping a dog’s claws, cleaning its ears or teeth and treating parasites.

Animal Groomers advise owners on their animals’ grooming, coat care and diet and when to seek veterinary advice.

Working Conditions: 

Dog /Animal Groomers usually work a standard full-time week, Monday to Saturday, with a day off during the week. Self-employed groomers often work flexible hours, including evenings and weekends, to meet the needs of their clients. Grooming dogs can take up to two hours for each animal.

 

Dog and other Animal Groomers mainly work indoors, in a private home, shop, veterinary practice or grooming room. A driving licence is useful for groomers who travel between different places of work.

There is a considerable amount of standing involved, and lifting of animals onto the grooming table. The work can be dusty and hairy and may not be suitable for some people with allergies.

Most Groomers wear an overall or apron for shampooing and gloves if using chemicals to treat parasites or skin conditions.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

 

  • A person starting out as a Dog/Animal Groomer may earn around £11,000 a year
  • Experienced Dog/Animals Groomers caring for dogs may earn £16,000 or more
  • Very experienced Dog/Animal Groomers, Managers or Supervisors of grooming businesses may earn around £20,000 or more.

Self-employed Dog/Animal Groomers usually charge set or negotiated fees per hour or appointment. The charge may vary according to the size of the animal being groomed and the work that is involved.

Skills: 

Parting a dog’s hair to check the skin for ticks, fleas, red, sore or inflamed areas and any lumps Checking a dog’s eyes, ears, mouth, nose, feet and nails Shampooing and drying, using specialist hairdryers or drying cabinets Brushing or combing to get rid of tangles Trimming a dog into the right shape for its breed, using electric clippers or a stripping knife Styling with scissors Final brushing, combing and trimming.

Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Able to use initiative
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Attention to detail.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest in animals, their care, behaviour and welfare
  • Enjoy working with individual animals and making them look good
  • Enjoy detailed work.

There are job opportunities for Dog/Animal Groomers in pet shops, specialist grooming businesses, show dog kennels and some veterinary practices throughout the UK.

You may look to take an apprenticeship in animal care following the dog grooming pathway, or your employer may choose to put you through relevant industry training.

The demand for groomers is increasing as more people have pets and there is a growing awareness about responsible pet ownership. However, competition is often strong for full-time vacancies. Many Dog Groomers are self-employed and run their own business.

Getting On: 

There are unlikely to be promotion prospects in small grooming businesses. In larger ones, Dog Groomers may be able to progress to Senior Groomer, Supervisor or Manager.

Many experienced Dog Groomers start up their own grooming business. Some move into lecturing or training in animal grooming or move into other areas of work with animals.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information:

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced)

  • Our Dogs and Dog World
  • Dog World
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Pet Business World
  • Your Cat
  • Fur and Feather
  • Dog Today
  • Animal Life
  • Animal Action
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Careers Working with Animals - Kogan Page
  • Grooming Manual for the Dog and Cat - Blackwell.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Animal Management Instructor / Technician

Also known as: 

Animal Technician; Animal Care Instructor; Animal Care Demonstrator.

Job Description: 

Animal Management Instructors look after the day-to-day care of animals in colleges, schools and universities. The role involves working with a wide range of animals, students, teaching staff and external visitors/agencies. Involvement with holiday/weekend clubs for children could also form part of the role.

The tasks are varied and can include:

  • Cleaning out the animal accommodation and changing bedding 
  • Ensuring that the animal enclosures are maintained
  • Cleaning and grooming the animals
  • Preparing food and feeding the animals 
  • Transporting animals between teaching areas and their accommodation 
  • Exercising animals
  • Providing enrichment to the enclosures
  • Teaching students
  • Preparing animals and equipment for practical lessons.
Working Conditions: 

Animal Management Instructors look after the day-to-day care of animals in colleges, schools and universities. The role involves working with a wide range of animals, students, teaching staff and external visitors/agencies. Involvement with holiday/weekend clubs for children could also form part of the role.

Animal Management Instructors typically work standard full-time hours to make sure that students are supervised at all times. However, as the animals need to be cared for seven days a week at all hours of the day, a shift system is normally in place to include early starts, weekends, bank holiday and evening working.

This role may also involve working outdoors in all types of weathers.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries for Animal Management Instructors are between £14000 to £16000 per year.
Skills: 
  • Cleaning out the animal accommodation and changing bedding
  • Cleaning and grooming the animals
  • Maintaining the health and welfare of animals
  • Transporting animals between teaching areas and their accommodation 
  • Exercising animals
  • Keeping relevant records
  • Conducting risk assessments on the animals kept and routine tasks
  • Answering questions and queries from colleagues, students, teaching staff and visitors to the centre
  • Supervising students during practical animal husbandry and handling
  • Maintaining the areas around the animal enclosures e.g. pathways, hedgerows, corridors etc.
  • Ordering supplies e.g. animal feeds, equipment.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Able to work in teams
  • Able to plan workloads.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Previous experience of working with animals is valuable, either in paid employment or as a volunteer, and so is experience of working with people and customer care.

A genuine concern and real enthusiasm for the welfare of animals is essential, together with a willingness to learn about general animal care. Holding a driving licence will also be of benefit.

You will need to be qualified to Level 3 in an appropriate animal care qualification.

Getting On: 

With the relevant experience and further training it may be possible to advance into a teaching, assessing or a lecturing position. There may also be opportunities to expand into other areas, such as animal collections or zoos. 

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information:

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • Times Education Supplement
  • VN Times
  • Your Dog
  • Your Cat
  • Horse and Hound
  • Fur and Feather
  • Pet Business World
  • Dogs Today
  • Dog World
  • Teaching Dogs
  • Farmers Weekly.
Industry: 

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