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Equine

Jockey

Job Description: 

You would enter the industry as an Apprentice Jockey and work with a Jockey, Trainer or Owner to progress to become a Jockey after gaining the experience before becoming registered. 

A Jockey is a highly trained professional who will be contracted by a licensed trainer to ride their horses at public race meetings.  They may race either on the flat (on a race track without obstacles) or across jumps (known as National Hunt racing). Jockeys usually specialises in either flat or jump racing, although some take part in both. 

Work would include:

  • Planning racing strategies with the owner and trainer
  • Taking advice from the trainer on tactics to suit the horse and the track
  • Riding every day to train and exercise the horses 
  • Riding at flat or jump races at race tracks around the UK.
Working Conditions: 

A Jockey would work around 40 to 45 hours a week depending on the number of races they take part in. There will be a significant amount of travelling involved as jockeys are required to attend races at courses throughout the UK. 

The work is physically demanding, often involving early starts and late finishes.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from town; sometimes in quite remote areas. Therefore a driving licence may be useful.

There is high risk of injury from falls and kicks when working around horses so it important to ensure you are protected therefore Jockeys should wear suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including riding boots, waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat when riding.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

A Jockey will receive a riding fee and a percentage of any prize money won. It may also be possible for some Jockeys to secure a sponsorship deals.

Skills: 
  • Identifying, planning and setting programmes to improve your technical skills, physical capabilities and sporting commitments
  • Recognise signs of equine illness and deliver basic health care treatment to horses
  • Introduce young horses to equipment for the schooling of racehorses
  • Ride racehorses to improve performance
  • Assist with designing training programmes for racehorses
  • A high level of skill in riding and handling horses
  • Maintaining the health and well being of equines.
Personal Qualities: 
  • The ability to work well with others
  • Good eyesight and fast reaction speeds
  • Determination and dedication
  • Fitness, strength and stamina.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Jockeys usually start off working as a stable hand (also known as groom), work rider or as an apprentice, doing tasks like filling hay nets, sweeping the yard, mucking out stables, grooming, feeding and watering horses, and taking horses through exercises.

A Jockey’s weight limit is about 9 stone 7lbs as a Jump Jockey and about 8 stone as a Flat Jockey.

The first step to become a Professional Jockey is to become employed on a racing yard as an Apprentice (flat racing) or Conditional Jockey (Jump Racing) and then attend many training courses in the process.

An Apprentice or Conditional Jockey receives training on the job. The trainer is responsible for choosing suitable horses to ride and deciding when apprentice/Conditional Jockeys are competent and ready to race (usually after about two years).

Apprentice /Conditional Jockeys then apply to the British Horseracing Authority for a license to ride. This includes a 5-day residential Apprentice or Conditional License course and a medical at the BRS in Newmarket or the NRC in Doncaster. 

Once the license, is awarded, an apprentice or Conditional Jockey would complete the Apprenticeship at the trainer's yard. You would usually do this between the ages of 16 and 25 (27 for racing over jumps), after which you can become a Professional Jockey.

To keep the license, Jockeys then need to continue their development by taking a 4-day Apprentice or Conditional Continuation course and an advanced Apprentice or Conditional course.

Getting On: 

There are more than 550 racing stables around the country, mainly in rural areas. Employment prospects for trained stable hands are usually good but progression to apprentice Jockey is difficult and becoming a successful Professional Jockey even more so.

A Professional Jockey may work for one trainer or owner, or ride for different trainers and owners as a self-employed jockey. There are opportunities to work for stables overseas, especially in Dubai, Japan and the USA.

Jockeys usually retire from riding by age 45 (35 for jump jockeys). At the end of the racing career, Jockeys can get advice on retraining and employment from the Jockeys Employment and Training Scheme.

Further Information: 

Additional information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced): 

  • The Racing Post
  • Racing Ahead
  • Horse and Hound.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Riding Instructor/Coach

Also known as: 

Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach; Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach; Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach; or Level 4 Coach.

Job Description: 

They will work with riders of all ages, levels of ability and experience ranging form the complete beginner to the more experienced competitors dependent on your own abilities. 

The Instructor/Coach will plan, deliver and review safe and competent lessons.  Each level of instructor will be competent to work with different levels of students as follows:

  • Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach will support senior qualified coaches and instructors to teach students
  • Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach will run coaching sessions for riders from beginners to Novice level, lunging of horse and rider to show improvement, and jumping to Stage 2 Level.
  • Intermediate Instructor/level 3 Coach should be able to show genuine improvement of horse and rider, demonstrate sound practical business knowledge and be conversant with running a commercial yard.
  • Instructor/Level 4 Coach is qualified to teach riders up to the level of Advanced Medium Dressage, Intermediate Horse Trials and Foxhunter level show jumping.

Planning, conducting and reviewing coaching sessions is common at all levels of coaching.  The different levels of Instructor/Coach will be trained to coach in their specialist area and will prepare, deliver and review sessions in activities such as Dressage, Showjumping, Eventing, Horseball, Reining, Endurance, Driving, Riding for the Disabled, Vaulting, Polo cross and Western. For more information go to www.bef.co.uk.

The role is varied at the different levels but you will need to be able to:

 

Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach

At this level you would be expected to:

  • Assist other instructors/coaches with lessons
  • Check the correct tack is being used
  • Assist riders where necessary
  • Lead novice riders. 

Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach

At this level you would be expected to also:

  • Work with individuals or groups who want to ride for leisure, prepare for competitions or achieve equestrian qualifications
  • Provide practical demonstrations to support others
  • Teach classroom theory sessions to support others.

Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach

At this level you would be expected to also be able to:

  • Work with individuals or groups who want to ride for leisure, prepare for competitions or achieve equestrian qualifications
  • Provide practical demonstrations to support others
  • Teach classroom theory sessions to support others
  • Attend events and be a role model at county/regional level
  • Prepare, deliver and evaluating annual programmes for rider development
  • Supervise others, such as Trainee Instructors/Level 1 Coach and Assistant Instructors/Level 2 Coach
  • Train horses, riding and schooling them from the ground. 

Instructor/Level 4 Coach

At this level you would be expected to also be able to:

  • Manage and assess staff/trainees
  • Show that you are competent and confident in all aspects of horse care and management
  • Undertake practical handling skills
  • Offer sound theoretical knowledge to other coaches/instructors
  • Manage the business aspects of an equestrian establishment
  • Train a variety of horses using sound training principles both on the flat and over fences
  • Work with horses on the ground
  • Actively compete horses in affiliated competitions. 
Working Conditions: 

An Instructor/Coach will have vast knowledge and skills of handling and riding horses.  They will also have lots of experience in different aspects of equine theory and management.  The hours of work may vary but usually will include evenings and weekends. The work can also be seasonal depending on the place of work.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from towns; sometimes in quite remote areas.  Therefore a driving licence may be useful.  Due to location some instructors work away from home or live in at the riding school.

The work can take place outside on grass, all weather arenas or in indoor arenas. 

An Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach should be smartly dressed the usual attire includes; jodhpurs, riding boots/half chaps, and suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat. 

There is a risk of injury when working around horses as they may bite, kick or stand on your feet. 

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live and your level of competence.

  • Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach may be paid a basic wage with training and lessons they may also be on an apprentice programme. All employed apprentices must receive the appropriate national minimum wage (£2.65 for under 19 and first year apprentices, £4.68 for 19 and 20 year olds and £6.19 for those aged 21 and over).
  • Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach may earn £12-£20 per hour freelance or £12,000 to £17,000 a year in employment. A more experienced, successful, Assistant Instructor/ Level 2 Coach who is a well known competitor in their chosen discipline, may earn £20 - £30 per hour
  • Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach may earn £15 - £25 per hour freelance or £14,000 - £20,000 a year in employment.  A more experienced, successful, Intermediate Instructor/Level 3 Coach who is a well known competitor in their chosen discipline, may earn £25 - £35 per hour
  • Instructor/Level 4 Coach may earn £20-30 per hour freelance or £18,000 to £25,000 a year in employment.  A more experienced, successful, Instructor/ Level 4 Coach who is a well known competitor in their chosen discipline, may earn £30 - £40 per hour
  • The rate of pay in employment depends on the size of the employer’s establishment, experience and whether accommodation, meals and further training is included.

Freelance earnings would depend on experience, success in attracting business and the number of hours worked

Skills: 
  • Carry out stable yard duties
  • Complete any administration required at your level of competence
  • Establish and maintain good customer service and working relationships with others
  • Monitor personal skills for instructing/coaching practice
  • Ensure that all coaching is carried out safely, fairly and in a suitable environment
  • Provide classroom and stable management lectures
  • Advise on safe and appropriate clothing and conduct
  • Prepare and deliver theory and practical lessons for individuals or groups at different levels of your own competence
  • Assess riders at your own level of competence
  • Give practical demonstrations to others.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a real desire to help people improve
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Good communication skills
  • Able  to work in a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Although there are different ways to enter the industry you may enter this role being a groom within a stable and progress to Instructor after gaining experience and qualifications. 

There are opportunities to gain employment as a trainee instructor/Level 1 Coach, Assistant Instructor/Level 2 Coach or apprentice within a range or riding establishments. 

These could be members of Association of British Riding Schools (ABRS). The British Horse Society (BHS) riding schools have to be registered with the local authority but do not have to be members of any organisation. Riding schools can range in size from those with only one instructor to those employing a dozen or more.

Other routes to becoming an Instructor include; college, through competing in a specific discipline such as show jumping or dressage and training with the affiliate body.

Getting On: 

A fully qualified Instructor/Coach could progress to become a Senior Instructor/Coach at a riding school, freelance or within their chosen discipline.

There may also be opportunities to work abroad and qualified Instructor/Coaches can apply for an International Equestrian Trainers Passport which is recognised in 32 countries.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • The Riding Instructor’s Handbook – BHS
  • Coaching Skills for Riding Teachers
  • The Principles of Teaching Riding - ABRS
  • Magazines/journals:
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Horse and Rider.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Riding Centre Manager

Also known as: 

Equine Tourism Manger; Horse Riding Holiday Centre Manager; Trekking Centre Manager.

Job Description: 

Riding Centre Managers oversee the running of horse riding centres that offer riding and trekking holidays.  Some Riding Centre Managers also own the riding and trekking establishments.

Riding Centre Managers are also responsible for the organisation, operation and marketing of the centre, and for supervising the care of the horses.

An Riding Centre Manager job varies depending on the employer but the main tasks include:

  • Balance the organisation of the riding centre and welfare and care of the animals with the marketing and operation of a holiday centre
  • Liaise with local tour operators to enhance business opportunities
  • Ordering of all supplies including horse food, supplements etc.
  • Ensuring that the business meets health and safety requirements
  • Planning and organising all business aspects of the centre, including marketing, administration, customer care, finances and insurances
  • Overseeing the management of the horses and ensuring the treks are suitably planned
  • Arranging daily routines for horse care and stable management
  • Handling queries, problems and complaints
  • Recruiting and managing staff, organising work rotas and arranging training.
Working Conditions: 

Riding Centre Managers usually work long hours that include evenings and weekends. The hours of work depend on the type and size of the centre. Riding Centre Managers spend some time working indoors in an office but also work outdoors in all weather conditions.

Trekking centres are situated throughout the UK but are more common in rural parts of the country, such as the National Parks of Dartmoor, Exmoor and the Lake District, and in coastal areas that are popular with tourists.

Before working with children, applicants must undergo checks through the Criminal Records Bureau.

There is a risk of injury when working around horses as they may bite, kick or stand on your feet so it important to ensure you are protected therefore all personnel working with equines should wear suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including riding boots, waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat when exercising or riding.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

There figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries are usually around £16,000 per year
  • Experienced Riding Centre Managers can earn around £20,000 per year.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Leadership and decision making
  • A good riding ability
  • Thorough knowledge and understanding of stable management
  • Customer-care
  • Business administration and management skills and or qualifications
  • Sound knowledge of horse breeds which are suitable for recreational riding
  • Maintain your own and others health and safety and appropriate Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) required for the work
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare legislations and codes of practice
  • Knowledge, experience and training in equestrian work.
  • Maintenance of grasslands for equines
  • Map reading skills for planning and taking rides.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communications skills
  • Genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Flexible with regards to working hours and location
  • Self motivated
  • Willing to undertake routine and practical tasks.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

People usually start in related jobs, such as an Assistant Ride Leader, Trainee Instructor/Level 1 Coach or Groom, and work their way up to a management role.

Academic qualifications are often required as well as a real interest and enthusiasm for working with horses. 

If you are working in the equestrian tourism industry, you can complete equestrian tourism qualifications. These are especially suitable if you take out treks, trail rides or hacks (for more experienced riders).

Getting On: 

Riding Centre Managers may also have the opportunity to expand their skills and qualifications.  This would depend on the size and type of equestrian establishment they work in.

Other roles could include:

  • Equine Tourism Examiner
  • Instructor/Coach
  • Yard Manager
  • Horse Transporter
  • Business Yard Manager. 
Further Information: 

Additional information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Your Horse
  • Horse and Rider.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Stud Manager

Job Description: 

Stud Managers are employed by equestrian business owners to make sure the yard runs efficiently. A Stud Manager is responsible for the day to day running of the yard including managing staff, care of the horses, all aspects of health and safety and dealing with clients.

As a Stud Manager, you could work on various types of yards, such as competition, breeding, training, riding schools, racing and trekking. Your work would depend partly on the type and size of the yard but you may be required to:

  • Plan the running of the equestrian yard
  • Plan the horses’ exercise routine
  • Plan horses’ routine care and keep appropriate records for vaccinations, farrier, teeth and worming
  • Purchase and maintenance of feed and equipment
  • Keep appropriate records such as financial, insurance, accident reporting
  • Conduct risk assessments
  • Maintenance of grassland
  • Select, purchase and sell horses
  • Recruit, train and supervise staff.

On smaller equestrian establishments, you may have sole charge of a yard and do more practical work, such as looking after the horses, riding horses and yard maintenance.

In competition, hunting or racing yards, Yard Managers may also prepare horses for events and may accompany them. In smaller studs and breeding yards, duties may also include working with stallions, mares and foals, assisting with foaling and handling young stock.

Depending on your skills and qualifications, you may also have responsibility for other activities, for example running competitions, instructing, transporting horses, promoting and marketing the establishment and liaising with owners/clients.

Working Conditions: 

Stud Managers work around 40 hours a week but may work longer on occasions. Early mornings, late nights and weekend working is common practice for Stud Managers. Work can involve lifting, carrying, bending, climbing and standing for long periods.

As a Stud Manager work is mainly outdoors, in all weather conditions. You would wear suitable footwear and outdoor wear and when handling horses and a hard hat, riding boots and preferably a body protector when riding. There is a risk of injury if a horse bites or kicks you or you fall off.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from towns; sometimes in quite remote areas. Therefore a driving licence may be useful.

Due to location and the nature of the job role, some positions are live-in where, with overall responsibility of the Yard, you may be on call to respond to any emergencies or issues on the yard.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Salaries for Stud Managers may be around £14,000 - £20,000 a year.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees; horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Care for visitors
  • Purchase products or services for the land-based organisation
  • Establish hygiene and biosecurity arrangements
  • Ensure a healthy and safe workplace
  • Define and meet personnel requirements
  • Establish and implement a horse care policy
  • Inspect horses for specific requirements
  • Establish critical pre-inspection requirements
  • Establish basic training
  • Control and organise the breeding of horses
  • Establish and implement a breeding policy
  • Control and organise the rearing of young stock
  • Control and organise foaling and care of the foal
  • Oversee the sales preparation procedures.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Good communications skills
  • Good organisation skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Self-motivated
  • Have the ability to work alone and also as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To become a Stud Manager it is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest, knowledge and experience of working with horses and their welfare
  • Enjoy working outdoors
  • Have good organisational and leadership skills.

Stud Managers work throughout the UK and abroad. Employers include riding schools, private stables, competition yards, college equine units, polo yards, livery stables, producers, stud yards, hunting yards, trekking centres, horse rehabilitation centres and the Armed Forces.

Job opportunities for Stud Managers are reasonably good. However, to improve employment opportunities it is recommended that you gain experience working on a yard as a Groom or Yard Assistant for a number of years to:

  • Improve your skills and experience of working with horses.
  • Meet other potential employers
  • Gain relevant qualifications
  • Confirm if you would like to continue to work in this environment.
Getting On: 

With experience and relevant qualifications it is possible to further develop your skills in a number of directions.This may provide you with more responsibilities with an existing employer depending on the size of the organisation. It may be necessary to seek opportunities with an alternative employer in order to progress.

Experienced Stud Managers may also become:

  • Instructor/Coach
  • HGV Driver
  • Rider
  • Event Co-ordinator
  • Trainer (Racing)
  • Stud Manager
  • Business Manager.

Stud Managers wanting to also become riding instructors can take BHS or ABRS teaching qualifications.

There are opportunities to work and train abroad.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Your Horse
  • Horse and Rider
  • Horse and Pony.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Stud Hand

Also known as: 

Stud Groom; Assistant Stud Groom.

Job Description: 

A Stud Hand will be responsible for the care of several mares. Duties include general handling of mares and foals. This involves turning them out, fetching them in, holding them for teasing, covering, veterinary inspection, farriery and presenting them to owners and clients. Stud staff may be required to work at the bloodstock sales after the breeding season (source: Northern Racing College). 

Working Conditions: 

Stud-hands will work around 40 hours a week, but may work longer on occasions. There may be early mornings, late nights and weekend working. Part-time, seasonal and casual work is often available. Most of the work is outdoors, in all weather conditions. Work can involve lifting, carrying, bending, climbing and standing for long periods. Stables can be dusty.

There is a risk of injury if a horse bites or kicks you or you fall off. Stables can be a long way from towns; sometimes in quite remote areas therefore a driving licence may be useful.

Some jobs involve travelling and staying away from home.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account. 

Skills: 
  • Maintain the health and well-being of equines
  • Maintain harness and saddles
  • Groom and clean a horse
  • Maintain your own health and safety and appropriate personal protective equipment required for this work
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare and health and safety legislation/codes of practice
  • Preparing horses for shows, racing or transport
  • Maintain records
  • Able to recognise signs of equine illnesses.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare 
  • Good communications skills
  • Good organisation skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Self-motivated
  • Have the ability to work alone and also as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To become a Stud Hand it is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Enjoy working outdoors
  • Like working with people.

To improve employment opportunities it is recommended that volunteering or taking seasonal/temporary work are considered so as to provide potential entrants with an opportunity to:

  • Gain experience (confirming expectations/ensuring it is what they want to do)
  • Gain some of the skill requirements
  • Show the employer what they can do
  • Show the employer that they have a desire to work in the industry
  • Network with other potential employers.
Getting On: 

With experience and relevant qualifications it is possible to progress to management or more senior positions.

The career structure will vary depending on the size of the organisation. It may be necessary to seek opportunities with an alternative employer in order to progress.

Experienced Stud Hands may become:

  • A Stud Manager.

There are also opportunities to work and train abroad.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • Horse and Hounds
  • British Horse
  • Horse and Pony
  • Horse and Rider
  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Trek Leader / Centre Operator

Also known as: 

Ride Leader; Horse Riding Holiday Leader.

Job Description: 

Jobs vary depending on the employer but the main tasks are usually:

  • Assess riders' ability and confidence and choose horses or ponies to suit them
  • Explain safety procedures and riding techniques, such as mounting, dismounting and halting
  • Make sure that all riders wear appropriate clothing and follow safety procedures.

They may also be responsible for:

  • The care of horses or ponies
  • Planning routes
  • Making sure that tack is kept clean and in good order
  • Checking the standard of grooming and the general care of horses and ponies.

Trek Leaders may have to organise yard staff and train Assistant Ride Leaders. They must also be able to take temporary charge of the centre when the owner or manager is away.

Working Conditions: 

Working hours tend to be long and can include evening and weekend work, especially during the main holiday period. Many Trek Leaders work part-time or seasonally. Most of the work takes place outdoors in all weather conditions.

Trek Leaders organise and run horse and pony riding activities, particularly treks and hacks across open countryside. They may work with groups or individuals and visitors can be first-time riders, through to experienced riders.

With the right qualifications there may be opportunities to work abroad. 

Salary & Other Benefits: 

There figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live and the success of the business.

  • Starting salaries are usually around £12,000 – 16,000  per year
  • Experienced Trek Leaders can earn around £18,000 per year.

Some employers provide accommodation and food. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Maintain the health and well being of equines
  • Maintain tack
  • Restrain a horse when necessary
  • Groom and clean a horse
  • Maintain yours and others health and safety and ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is worn by everyone
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare and health and safety legislations and codes of practice
  • Recognise signs of equine illness
  • Maintain records
  • Map reading skills and familiarity with the local countryside
  • Communicate with others. 
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have good riding skills
  • Have good customer service skills
  • Have good communication skills
  • Be able to meet the physical demands of the job
  • Flexible with regards to working hours and location
  • Self-motivated.

Trek Leaders also need to be aware of health and safety requirements and be able to deal appropriately with any emergency situations.

Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Trek Leaders need good riding skills and experience of horse care and management. Some Trek Leaders have first worked as Assistant Trek Leaders escorting up to six riders on short rides, treks or hacks, and helping Trek Leaders on rides or treks which are longer or have more riders.

Relevant experience and qualifications can be gained the following ways:

  • On-the-job training at a Trekking Centre
  • Attending a college course
  • Attending a riding school as a fee-paying student
  • Studying by distance learning whilst in a relevant job (for example as a groom).

Volunteering and seasonal work can be a good way to get started.

Before working with children, applicants must undergo checks through the Criminal Records Bureau

Getting On: 

Trek Leaders / Centre Operators may progress into specific areas such as a Equine Tourism Centre which are common in coastal areas and rural areas such as Dartmoor, Exmoor and the Lake District.

Trek Leaders may also have the opportunity to progress to Yard Managers or Riding Centre Manager but this will depend on the opportunities available and may mean moving to another establishment.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Trek Assistant

Also known as: 

Assistant Ride Leader.

Job Description: 

A Trek Assistant will assist the Trek Leader in organising and running horse and pony riding activities, particularly treks and hacks across open countryside.

They may work with organised groups, individuals or small family units. Visitors can be first-time riders, novices or experienced riders.

A Trek Assistant may be employed at a riding or trekking centre.   

Working Conditions: 

Working hours tend to be long and can include evening and weekend work, especially during the main holiday period. Many Trek Assistants work part-time or seasonally.

Most of the work takes place outdoors in all weather conditions.

With the right qualifications there may be opportunities to work abroad.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Rates of pay will vary, depending on the employer and where people live.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction.

Individual salaries may vary to take this into account. 

Skills: 

 

  • Maintain the health and well being of equines
  • Maintain tack
  • Restrain a horse when necessary
  • Groom and clean a horse
  • Maintain yours and others health and safety and ensure that appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) is worn by everyone
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare and health and safety legislations and codes of practice
  • Recognise signs of equine illness
  • Communicate with others
  • Assisting the trek leader driving a trek
  • Assisting with mounting and dismounting
  • Map reading skills and familiarity with the local countryside.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have good riding skills
  • Have good customer service skills
  • Have good communication skills
  • Be able to meet the physical demands of the job
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Flexible with regards to working hours and location
  • Self-motivated
  • Willing to undertake routine, practical tasks.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Trek Assistants work throughout the UK, although most will be situated in scenic or remote locations.

No academic qualifications are needed to become a Trek Assistant but a real interest and enthusiasm for working with horses is very important. To improve employment opportunities, it is recommended that volunteering or taking seasonal/temporary work is undertaken.

This will provide potential entrants with an opportunity to:

  • Gain experience (confirming expectations / ensuring it is what they want to do)
  • Gain some of the skill requirements
  • Show the employer what they can do
  • Show the employer that they have a desire to work in the industry
  • Network with other potential employers.
Getting On: 

Trek Assistants can progress to the role of Trek Leader with further experience and training.

Trek Assistants could find work overseas, as the qualifications are recognised internationally

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Horse and Rider
  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Groom

Also known as: 

Stud Groom; Assistant Stud Groom; Stud hand; Assistant Groom; Performance Horse Groom; Racing Groom; Stable lad/lass/hand; Competition Groom; Assistant Performance Horse Groom; Assistant Racing Groom; Assistant Stable lad/lass/hand; Assistant Yard Manager; or Assistant Competition Groom. 

Job Description: 

You may be entering the industry as an assistant groom but should have some experience of working with horses, as a volunteer or from work experience; you will progress to being a Groom after gaining experience and skills whilst working under supervision. 

 

Grooms will undertake all the practical horse care tasks of looking after horses on a daily basis to ensure that they remain healthy, happy and in good condition. 

The Groom may also be responsible for exercising the horses each day.  This will include exercising from the ground, riding out on the road, inside and outside schooling on the flat and over fences. 

 

Grooms will have some degree of responsibility for dealing with people.  This may include interacting with customers and at racing and competition yards you would be expected to interact with the owners too. 

Some Grooms roles may also include driving the horsebox (please see Horse Transporter Job Information). 

 

In studs and breeding yards, duties will also include: 

 

  • Caring for an preparing mares for covering
  • Attending to mares and foals during and after foaling
  • Working with stallions
  • Assisting with embryo transfer procedures
  • Assisting with artificial insemination procedures
  • Keep in close contact with owners
  • Maintaining the stud records.
 

In riding schools and trekking centres grooms you may also have to:

 

  • Greet clients
  • Lead riders out on foot
  • Accompany riders on horseback.
 

A Groom working in competition, hunting or racing yards, will prepare horses for events and may also accompany them.   

Working Conditions: 

Grooms work around 40 hours a week, but may work longer on occasions.  Part time and casual work may also be available.  Most of the work is outdoors, in all weather conditions.

There will be early mornings, late nights and weekend work.  Work can involve heavy lifting, carrying, bending, climbing and standing for long periods and stables can be dusty. 

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from town; sometimes in quite remote areas.  Therefore a driving licence may be useful.  Due to location and the nature of the job role, some grooms positions are ‘live-in’ and most involve travelling and staying away from home e.g. during competitions.

There is a risk of injury when working around horses as they may bite, kick or stand on your feet so it important to ensure you are protected therefore Grooms should wear suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including riding boots, waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat when exercising or riding.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

 

  • Starting salaries are usually in line with the national minimum wage
  • Experienced grooms may earn around £12,000 - £16,000 per year.

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Maintain the health and well-being of equines
  • Maintain harness and saddles
  • Groom and clean a horse
  • Maintain your own health and safety and appropriate personal protective equipment required for this work
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare and health and safety legislation/codes of practice
  • Preparing horses for shows, racing or transport
  • Maintain records
  • Able to recognise signs of equine illnesses.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Have a genuine interest in horses and their welfare
  • Good communications skills
  • Good organisation skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Self motivated
  • Have the ability to work alone and also as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

It is recommended that volunteering or taking seasonal/temporary work will provide you with experience and an opportunity to gain some of the basic skills.

 

One entry route is through an apprenticeship/modern apprenticeship route for which there are no entry requirements but employers will look for experience and interest.

 

You may have been working in the industry as s Stable Lad/Lass, Assistant Groom or Assistant Stud Groom.

 

There are many different types of Grooms and positions may be available in any of the following:

 

  • Riding schools
  • Private stables
  • Competition yards
  • College equine units
  • Polo yards
  • Livery stables
  • Stud yards
  • Hunting yards
  • Trekking centres
  • Producers
  • Horse rehabilitation centres
  • The armed forces. 
Getting On: 

With experience and relevant qualifications it is possible to progress to an Assistant Instructor Coach position. The career structure will vary depending on the size of the organisation. It may be necessary to seek opportunities with an alternative employer in order to progress.

 

Experienced Grooms may become:

 

  • Assistant Stud Manager or Yard Manager
  • Yard or Stud Manager
  • Riding Instructor.
  • Trainer
  • Jockey.
 

Grooms wanting to become Riding Instructors can take BHS, ABRS or specific coaching qualifications.

There are also opportunities to work and train abroad. 

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

 

Industry Information

 

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium.
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Yard Manager

Also known as: 

Head Groom; Head Lad/Lass; Stud Manager; Stable Manager.

Job Description: 

Yard Managers are employed by equestrian business owners to make sure the yard runs efficiently.  A Yard Manager is responsible for the day to day running of the yard including managing staff, care of the horses, all aspects of health and safety and dealing with clients/owners.  This role is mostly office based.

As a Yard Manager, you may work on various types of yards, such as competition, breeding, training, riding schools, racing and trekking. Your work would depend partly on the type and size of the yard.  

On smaller equestrian establishments, you may have sole charge of a yard and do more practical work, such as looking after the horses, riding horses and yard maintenance. 

In competition, hunting or racing yards, Yard Managers may also prepare horses for events and accompany them.

In stud and breeding yards, duties may also include: 

  • Working with stallions, mares and foals
  • Assisting with foaling and handling youngstock 
  • Responsibility for the selecting and purchasing of stallions
  • Defra qualified AI technician duties including the collection, storage and dissemination of fresh, chilled and frozen semen
  • Handling of mares and stallions during breeding, training of youngsters
  • Purchasing of stallions and other bloodstock
  • Keep appropriate records such as stud data
  • Responsible for the day to day management of stallions, broodmares (including the supervision of foaling), foals and young stock.

You may also have responsibility for other activities, for example:

  • Running competitions
  • Instructing
  • Transporting horses’
  • Promoting and marketing the establishment
  • Liaising with owners/clients
  • Driving HGV and non-HGV vehicles such as horseboxes, tractors and trailers.
Working Conditions: 

Yard Managers work around 40 hours a week but may work longer on occasions. Early mornings, late nights and weekend working is a common practice for Yard Managers. 

Most of the work is outdoors, in all weather conditions.  Work can involve lifting, carrying, bending, climbing and standing for long periods.

Equestrian businesses are often a long way from town; sometimes in quite remote areas. Therefore a driving licence may be useful. 

Due to location and the nature of the job role, some Yard Manager positions are ‘live-in’ and most involve travelling and staying away from home e.g. during competitions. If you hold a ‘live-in position you will have the overall responsibility of the yard and therefore may be called upon to respond to any emergencies or issues at any time day or night.

There is a risk of injury when working around horses as they may bite, kick or stand on your feet so it important to ensure you are protected therefore Yard Managers should wear suitable Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) including riding boots, waterproofs, suitable outdoor clothing, a body protector and a hard hat when exercising or riding.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Salaries will range from £12,000 a year for an Assistant Yard Manager to £24,000 a year for a Yard Manager. 

Some employers provide accommodation, food, free stabling for their employees’ horses and riding instruction. Individual salaries may vary to take this into account.

Skills: 
  • Maintain the health and well-being of equines
  • Plan the running of the equestrian yard
  • Maintain your own and others health and safety and the appropriate personal protective equipment (PPE) required for the work
  • Be responsible under relevant animal health and welfare and health and safety legislation and codes of practice
  • Recognise signs of equine illnesses
  • Maintain records
  • Manage budgets
  • Communicate with others effectively
  • Selecting, purchasing and selling of horses
  • Recruit, train and supervise staff.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Flexible with regards to working hours and location
  • Self-motivated
  • Excellent communication skills
  • Be an effective team leader
  • Have good organisational and leadership skills
  • Be willing to undertake and oversee routine, practical tasks
  • Have a genuine interest, knowledge and experience of working with horses and their welfare.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Equine Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Equine

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Equine and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Yard Managers need plenty of practical experience with excellent organisational and communication skills and the ability to run a business.  They will work throughout the UK and abroad. 

You may enter this industry as an Assistant Yard Manager before progressing after gaining experience to a Yard Managers position

Employers may include riding schools, private stables, competition yards, college equine units, polo yards, livery stables, producers, stud yards, hunting yards, trekking centres, horse rehabilitation centres and the armed forces.

To improve employment opportunities it is recommended that you gain experience working on a yard as a Groom or Yard Assistant for a number of years whilst specialising in a specific area such as breeding to:

  • Improve your skills and experience of working with horses. 
  • Meet other potential employers
  • Gain relevant qualifications
  • Confirm if you would like to continue to work in this environment
  • Specialise within the industry. 
Getting On: 

With experience and relevant qualifications it is possible to further develop your skills in a number of directions.  This may provide you with more responsibilities with an existing employer depending on the size of the organisation. 

It may be necessary to seek opportunities with an alternative employer in order to progress.

Experienced Yard Managers may also become:

  • Instructor/Coach
  • Event Co-ordinator
  • Trainer (Racing)
  • Owner of a yard.

There may also be opportunities to work and train abroad. 

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry Information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

  • ABRS Handbook - ABRS
  • BHS Guide to Careers with Horses
  • British Grooms Association Magazine
  • Equine Industry Welfare Guidelines Compendium
  • Horse and Hound
  • Horse
  • Your Horse
  • Horse and Rider.

     

    Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Groom - Katie Stephen

Katie Stephen from Hawick in Roxburghshire has always been passionate about horses and currently works as a Groom at an eventing yard. Katie, who is now 18, has undertaken a Level 2 Scottish Vocational Qualification (SVQ) in Horse Care, helped out at a local riding school and worked with professional riders and the Riding for the Disabled Association (RDA) – a charity that organises various equine activities for disabled people.

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