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Auxiliary Technician

Also known as: 

Animal Technician.

Job Description: 

Animal Technologists are responsible for the care and welfare of laboratory animals that are used in scientific research and assisting Licence Holders.

Research involving animals is a small but essential part of developing medicines, cures and therapies. Most of the animals used are rodents, such as mice and rats, but they can also include fish, frogs, ferrets, guinea pigs, rabbits, dogs, cats, monkeys and farm animals.

Approximately three and a half million animals are used in research each year in the UK. The industry is tightly regulated by the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. Under this Act, research establishments have to be certified and all scientific projects using animals must be licensed by the Home Office.

Technologists must also prove they are suitably qualified, trained and experienced. The Act acknowledges the necessity of using animals in research, but demands a high level of protection for them in order to minimise any potential suffering.

The daily responsibilities of an Animal Technologist may include:

    Carrying out regular health checks on the animals in their care
    Ensuring rooms are at the optimum temperature and humidity
    Changing bedding and cleaning out cages or tanks
    Providing fresh water and food and, if necessary, organising special diets
    Making sure that the animals have been eating and drinking, and that their bodily functions are normal
    Handling the animals correctly and monitoring them to ensure that they are comfortable, in good condition and behaving as expected
    Providing environmental enrichment, exercising and training opportunities for animals
    Operating computerised scientific and electronic equipment
    Obtaining samples and measurements from the animals
    Recording and monitoring the animals’ weight and growth on charts and graphs.

Animal Technologists are expected to keep accurate records and input data onto computer systems and some Animal Technologists are also involved in complex breeding programmes and the setting up of scientific studies.

Working Conditions: 

Animals need looking after seven days a week, fifty-two weeks a year. Therefore a typical working pattern may include early starts, late nights, weekend or bank holiday working, although many facilities operate over core hours during the normal working week.

There may be opportunities to work on a part-time basis.

Research work is carried out in laboratories. The environment is carefully controlled including the temperature, humidity, noise and lighting cycles.  Access is also strictly controlled.

Technologists are provided with protective clothing and overalls to help to maintain a hygienic environment. Depending on the work, disposable masks, gloves and shoe covers may also be worn.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

    The starting salary for a trainee Animal Technologist is about £12,000 to £15,000 a year
    Once fully qualified, Animal Technologists may earn between £15,000 and £30,000 a year
    Senior Technologists with managerial experience often earn in excess of £40,000 a year.
 

Skills: 

    Prepare environments for scientific procedures
    Prepare animals and equipment for general procedures
    Maintain stocks of resources, equipment and consumables
    Support the health and welfare of animals
    Handle animals
    Maintain bio-security procedures and infection controls
    Administer basic nursing care to animals
    Provide feed and water to animals
    Prepare and maintain accommodation for animals
    Select and move animals from one location to another.

Personal Qualities: 


    Good communication skills 
    Flexibility and adaptability
    Attention to detail
    Good organisation skills
 

Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

    Learn more about your chosen area
    find employment
    improve your current skills
    gain promotion
    enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Technology Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Technology

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Technology and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenti...

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprentic...

Getting In: 

It is important to:

    Enjoy caring for animals, but understand the need for them in research
    Be interested in working in a scientific research environment.

Animal Technologists work for a variety of organisations within the academic and commercial sectors. These include pharmaceutical companies, universities, veterinary colleges, specialist research organisations and animal breeding companies.

There are estimated to be between 4,000 and 5,000 Animal Technologists employed in the UK and employment prospects are good. Opportunities may be found throughout the UK in towns, cities and rural areas. There is a high concentration of pharmaceutical research in the South East, London and the East of England.

It is usual for entrants to have at least GCSEs (A*-C) in maths, English and one or more science subjects. Some employers may require A-levels or equivalent qualifications. Graduates from bio-medical science courses also tend to apply for these positions.

Experience of caring for animals, either paid or voluntary, is useful in demonstrating a commitment to working in this area. This may include experience at farms or kennels or in veterinary practices. It would be beneficial for applicants to display to a potential employer their genuine interest in animal care and welfare.

Getting On: 

Within this career there are many opportunities for specialisation, promotion and career development.  Key opportunities are to become a Licensed Animal Technologist or Named Animal Care and Welfare Officer.

There may be supervisory or management positions available. These are dependent on ability, relevant experience and the appropriate qualifications.

Being an Animal Technologist requires an undertaking for lifelong learning or Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in order to ensure that knowledge and skills are continually updated. The Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) organises and holds a variety of courses and meetings designed to support this.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:
Industry information

    Institute of Animal Technology - e-mail: Careers@iat.org.uk
    Medical Mouse
    Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) - Tel: 0845 933 5577.
    Home Office - Tel: 020 7035 4848
    Medical Research Council

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced):

    Animal Technology & Welfare - IAT
    Bulletin - IAT
    Lab Animal Europe
    New Scientist
    Nature 
    A Career as an Animal Technologist
    Introduction to Animal Technology - Wiley Blackwell
    Manual of Animal Technology - Wiley Blackwell
    Hobsons Guide to Careers in Science - Hobsons.

A to Z: 

Animal Technologist

Also known as: 
Animal Technician
Job Description: 

Technologists are responsible for the care and welfare of laboratory animals that are used in scientific research and assisting Licence Holders.

Research involving animals is a small but essential part of developing medicines, cures and therapies. Most of the animals used are rodents, such as mice and rats, but they can also include fish, frogs, ferrets, guinea pigs, rabbits, dogs, cats, monkeys and farm animals.

Approximately three and a half million animals are used in research each year in the UK. The industry is tightly regulated by the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986. Under this Act, research establishments have to be certified and all scientific projects using animals must be licensed by the Home Office.

Technologists must also prove they are suitably qualified, trained and experienced. The Act acknowledges the necessity of using animals in research, but demands a high level of protection for them in order to minimise any potential suffering.

The daily responsibilities of an Animal Technologist may include:

  •     Carrying out regular health checks on the animals in their care
  •     Ensuring rooms are at the optimum temperature and humidity
  •     Changing bedding and cleaning out cages or tanks
  •     Providing fresh water and food and, if necessary, organising special diets
  •     Making sure that the animals have been eating and drinking, and that their bodily functions are normal
  •     Handling the animals correctly and monitoring them to ensure that they are comfortable, in good condition and behaving as expected
  •     Providing environmental enrichment, exercising and training opportunities for animals
  •     Operating computerised scientific and electronic equipment
  •     Obtaining samples and measurements from the animals
  •     Recording and monitoring the animals’ weight and growth on charts and graphs.

Animal Technologists are expected to keep accurate records and input data onto computer systems and some Animal Technologists are also involved in complex breeding programmes and the setting up of scientific studies.

Animal Technology is a career that involves caring for animals within the evolving and sophisticated environment of a bio-medical research centre.

Working Conditions: 

Animals need looking after seven days a week, fifty-two weeks a year. Therefore a typical working pattern may include early starts, late nights, weekend or bank holiday working, although many facilities operate over core hours during the normal working week. There may be opportunities to work on a part-time basis. Research work is carried out in laboratories. The environment is carefully controlled including the temperature, humidity, noise and lighting cycles. Access is also strictly controlled. Technologists are provided with protective clothing and overalls to help to maintain a hygienic environment. Depending on the work, disposable masks, gloves and shoe covers may also be worn.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live. The starting salary for a trainee Animal Technologist is about £12,000 to £15,000 a year Once fully qualified, Animal Technologists may earn between £15,000 and £30,000 a year Senior Technologists with managerial experience often earn in excess of £40,000 a year.

Skills: 


    Prepare environments for scientific procedures
    Prepare animals and equipment for general procedures
    Maintain stocks of resources, equipment and consumables
    Support the health and welfare of animals
    Handle animals
    Maintain bio-security procedures and infection controls
    Administer basic nursing care to animalsProvide feed and water to animals
    Prepare and maintain accommodation for animals
    Select and move animals from one location to another
 

Personal Qualities: 


    Good communication skills
    Flexibility and adaptability
    Attention to detail
    Good organisation skills.

Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

    Learn more about your chosen area
    find employment
    improve your current skills
    gain promotion
    enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Technology Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Technology

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Technology and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenti...

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprentic...

Getting In: 

It is important to:

    Enjoy caring for animals, but understand the need for them in research
    Be interested in working in a scientific research environment.

Animal Technologists work for a variety of organisations within the academic and commercial sectors. These include pharmaceutical companies, universities, veterinary colleges, specialist research organisations and animal breeding companies.

There are estimated to be between 4,000 and 5,000 Animal Technologists employed in the UK and employment prospects are good. Opportunities may be found throughout the UK in towns, cities and rural areas. There is a high concentration of pharmaceutical research in the South East, London and the East of England.

It is usual for entrants to have at least GCSEs (A*-C) in maths, English and one or more science subjects. Some employers may require A-levels or equivalent qualifications. Graduates from bio-medical science courses also tend to apply for these positions.

Experience of caring for animals, either paid or voluntary, is useful in demonstrating a commitment to working in this area. This may include experience at farms or kennels or in veterinary practices.

It would be beneficial for applicants to display to a potential employer their genuine interest in animal care and welfare.

Getting On: 

Within this career there are many opportunities for specialisation, promotion and career development.  Key opportunities are to become a Licensed Animal Technologist or Named Animal Care and Welfare Officer.

There may be supervisory or management positions available. These are dependent on ability, relevant experience and the appropriate qualifications.

Being an Animal Technologist requires an undertaking for lifelong learning or Continuing Professional Development (CPD) in order to ensure that knowledge and skills are continually updated.

The Institute of Animal Technology (IAT) organises and holds a variety of courses and meetings designed to support this.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:
Industry information

    Institute of Animal Technology - e-mail: careers@iat.org.uk
    Medical Mouse
    Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (Defra) - Tel: 0845 933 5577
    Home Office - Tel: 020 7035 4848
    Medical Research Council

Publications (Some may be priced):

    Animal Technology & Welfare - IAT
    Bulletin - IAT
    Lab Animal Europe
    New Scientist
    Nature 
    A Career as an Animal Technologist
    Introduction to Animal Technology - Wiley Blackwell
    Manual of Animal Technology - Wiley Blackwell
    Hobsons Guide to Careers in Science - Hobsons.
 

A to Z: 

Artificial Insemination Technician

Also known as: 

Livestock Technician

Job Description: 

The main role of the artificial insemination technician is to inseminate livestock, cows, sheep or pigs. The technician may need to monitor the heat cycle of livestock so the carry out the insemination at the correct time or they may be relaying on farmers to do this for them.

The technician will be responsible for handling and thawing the straws of frozen semen that have been kept in liquid nitrogen. They will need to carry out the insemination process quickly and accurately while maintaining the welfare of the animal.

Depending on the place of work the technician may also have additional duties such as maintaining breeding animals, keeping records and giving advice to farmers on the best male animals to use. Some technicians may work closely with their veterinarian on specific breeding programmes or with farmers in a region of the UK supporting them with the insemination services.

Working Conditions: 

Most artificial insemination technicians will be working for large companies who specialise in providing breeding services. Therefore the work may involve a lot of driving around the UK and working outdoors or in barns/sheds.

Most technicians work in the field but some may also be involved in scientific research or working in academia.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

Salary of an artificial insemination technician will depend on the experience and education of the person. It may also be linked to success rates.

Some roles will include a car.

Skills: 
  • Animal health and welfare knowledge
  • Good knowledge of reproductive anatomy and physiology
  • Good knowledge of animal behaviour
  • Have artificial insemination skills
  • Understanding of breeding and genetics
  • Health and safety awareness.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Able to work with animals
  • Good communication and interpersonal skills
  • Basic numeracy and literacy
  • Able to work independently or with others
  • Good safety awareness
  • Problem-solving skills and initiative.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Artificial insemination technicians will need experience of working with livestock and have suitable training and qualifications to be able to offer advise and support on breeding.

There are a number of qualifications that will provide a good basis:

  • Edexcel BTEC Level 3 Diplomas or Extended diplomas in Agriculture (QCF)
  • City & Guilds Level 4 Diplomas or Extended Diplomas in Agricultural Business Management
  • Foundation degree in Agricultural Business Management or Animal Studies Lantra Awards Level 3 Award in Controlling Risks to Health and Safety in Agriculture and Production Horticulture
  • BSc (Hons) degree in Agriculture or similar subjects.
Getting On: 

Depending on the experience you may look to move into teaching and training of those entering the industry. There may also be opportunities to progress into research.

Further Information: 
A to Z: 
Industry: 

Arboricultural Surveyor

Job Description: 

An Arboricultural Surveyor could work for a local authority or a private company, or  be self employed. Within a local authority the role may sit within the planning or parks section.

This position requires a strong working knowledge of arboriculture.

The duties could primarily include:

  • Providing a specialist arboricultural service
  • Surveying managing and maintaining trees
  • Producing site reports
  • Managing trees in relation to planning applications and on construction sites
  • Advising on trees within the legal system e.g Tree Preservation Orders and Conservation Areas.

Duties may also include from time to time the need to assist in non-arboricultural operations, such as landscape advice and providing support to clients or other departments on large scale projects.

Working Conditions: 

Individuals must be fit and able to work outdoors in adverse weather conditions and a range of terrains.

Arboricultural surveyors typically work a standard full-time week. However, the hours may vary and weekend or Bank Holiday work can be required. There may be self-employed and consultancy opportunities available for well experienced arboriculturists.

Depending on the area covered, there may be a significant amount of travelling between different sites.

Arboricultural surveyors are likely to be provided with protective clothing, tools and equipment required to undertake the job.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries about £22,000 - £23,000 a year
  • With experience, an Arboricultural Surveyor  could earn around £29,000 – £35,000 a year.
Skills: 
  • Tree identification
  • Survey and inspect trees
  • Monitor and evaluate the management of planted areas
  • Monitor and maintain tree health
  • Managing the planting and maintenance of a woodland
  • Co-ordinate activities, resources and plans
  • Give arboricultural advice to internal or external clients
  • Evaluate plans and site drawings
  • Evaluate trees for legal protection
  • Prepare reports and documents.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Flexibility
  • Able to solve problems
  • Able to work in a team/with others
  • Energetic.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Trees and Timber Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Trees and Timber

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Trees and Timber and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To become an Arboricultural Surveyor it is important that you:

  • Enjoy working outside
  • Have good communication skills
  • Can manage and motivate people.

Individuals becoming an Arboricultural Surveyor will benefit if they have experience as a Groundworker or Climber. Some additional training may be needed in respect of planning legislation and legal tree protection.

Getting On: 

Experienced Arboricultural Surveyors may look to progressing to consultancy or an assistant Arboricultural Officer.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • A Guide to Qualifications and Careers in Arboriculture
  • Chartered Forester - ICF
  • Forestry Journal
  • Horticulture Week
  • Newsletter - Arboricultural Association
  • Quarterly Journal of Forestry - Royal Forestry Society
  • Treeline - International Society of Arboriculture UK and Ireland.

     

    Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Arboricultural Officer

Also known as: 

Tree Officer

Job Description: 

An Arboricultural Officer is typically a managerial role within a local authority. The level of the job may vary depending on the size of the authority. The role may sit within the planning or parks section.Arboricultural Officers have varied roles and usually deal with the general public and with the local authority tree stock. They will work on tree related issues in planning of developments, Tree Preservation Orders, may represent the local authority in court on tree matters and deal with enquiries from the general public about council trees.

Working Conditions: 

Individuals must be able to work outdoors in varied weather conditions.

Arboricultural Officers typically work a standard full-time week. However, the hours may vary and weekend or Bank Holiday work can be required. There may be self-employed and consultancy opportunities available for well experienced arboriculturists.

Depending on the area covered, there may be a significant amount of travelling between different sites.

Arboriculturists are likely to be provided with protective clothing, tools and equipment required to undertake the job.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries about £22,000 - £23,000 a year
  • With experience, an Arboricultural Officer could earn around £29,000 – £35,000 a year.
Skills: 
  • Tree identification
  • Survey and inspect trees
  • Prepare for, and agree, emergency arboricultural operations
  • Monitor and maintain tree health
  • Manage projects
  • Communication and customer service skills
  • Advise on plans and site drawings
  • Advise on trees for legal protection
  • Prepare reports and documents.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Flexibility
  • Able to solve problems
  • Able to work in a team/with others
  • Energetic.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Trees and Timber Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Trees and Timber

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Trees and Timber and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

To become an Arboricultural Officer it is important that you:

  • Enjoy working outside
  • Enjoy practical work
  • Have excellent communication skills
  • Can manage and motivate people.

Individuals becoming an Arboricultural Officer will have significant experience as a Groundworker or Climber. Some additional training may be needed particularly in respect of health and safety requirements.

Getting On: 

Experienced Arboricultural Officers may look to progressing to consultancy.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals (some may be priced)

  • A Guide to Qualifications and Careers in Arboriculture
  • Chartered Forester - ICF
  • Forestry Journal
  • Horticulture Week
  • Newsletter - Arboricultural Association
  • Quarterly Journal of Forestry - Royal Forestry Society
  • Treeline - International Society of Arboriculture UK and Ireland.

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Arboricultural Consultant

Job Description: 

An Arboricultural Consultant usually works within the private sector advising a range of public and private clients on the selection, health and maintenance requirements of trees. 

They can be involved, alongside landscape architects, in the preparation of planting schemes for new developments, but will usually be brought in to ensure the safety and health of established trees on a site.

The role of an arboricultural consultant can be varied. They will undertake tree inspections and surveys, preparing reports for clients. These may be on individual trees or on all the trees within a site. On the basis of this survey, they will make recommendations as to the work required to manage the tree.

On development sites, where established trees are endangered by construction work, the arboricultural consultant may be required to specify measures needed to protect trees from damage.

In cases of dispute, or where trees (or tree roots) have caused damage or injury, arboricultural consultants can be involved in court proceedings as expert witnesses. They also may do reports for mortgages. 

Working Conditions: 

Whilst this is largely an office based job, individuals should be fit and may be required to work outdoors in a wide range of weather conditions.

Depending on the area covered, there may be a significant amount of travelling between different sites to inspect trees at different locations; therefore a full driving license may be a requirement of the job.

Arboricultural Consultants typically work a standard full-time week. However, the hours may vary and weekend, evening or Bank Holiday work can be required.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries about £20,000 progressing to about £24,000 a year
  • With experience, an Arboricultural Consultant could earn around £25,000 – £35,000 a year.
Skills: 

 

  • Tree identification
  • Survey and inspect conditions of trees
  • Consult and work with local communities
  • Pest, disease and disorder identification
  • Work planning and monitoring
  • ICT use (word processing, spreadsheets, databases)
  • Work site safety and hazard recognition
  • Risk assessment
  • Build and maintain good customer relations.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills (written and verbal)
  • Be able to plan and manage work - good organisational skills
  • Be responsible and diligent
  • Enjoy working as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction
Getting In: 

The Arboricultural Consultant will usually have completed a degree level qualification in arboriculture or a related subject before working within a consultancy practice. 

They may have worked for a tree surgery company but many Arboricultural Consultants are independent of the maintenance role.

If you are interested in becoming an Arboricultural Consultant it is important that you:

  • Are well organised and have good planning skills
  • Have good written and verbal communication skills
  • Have good numeracy and ICT skills.
Getting On: 

Most people starting out in the role of Arboricultural Consultant will work for an established practice or within a local authority where it is possible to build up a client base.

There is always the opportunity for enterprising individuals to become self employed, establishing their own consultancy company.

Arboriculturists who have completed a level 4 qualification (or above) and worked for a number of years at a managerial level can seek to gain chartered status through the Institute of Chartered Foresters.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information:

Publications, magazines and journals

  • A Guide to Qualifications and Careers in Arboriculture
  • Chartered Forester - ICF
  • Forestry Journal
  • Horticulture Week
  • Newsletter - Arboricultural Association
  • Quarterly Journal of Forestry - Royal Forestry Society.

Jobs

Arboricultural jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Animal Care Assistant

Also known as: 

Supervised Animal Care Assistant, Animal Care Worker, Animal Care Auxiliary

Job Description: 

Animal Care Assistants look after the day to day care of animals in a variety of different settings under supervision. The work is carried out in places such as kennels and catteries, animal welfare centres, farm parks and grooming establishments and veterinary hospitals.

The Animal Care Assistant may have more direct daily contact with the animals than any other person within the organisation. It is therefore a very important and rewarding position.

The tasks are varied and may include:

  • Cleaning out the animal accommodation and changing bedding
  • Ensuring that the animal enclosures are maintained
  • Cleaning and grooming the animals
  • Preparing food and feeding the animals
  • Assisting with moving animals from one place to another
  • Exercising animals either in a yard or by taking them for walks
  • Checking for signs of illness or distress in the animals
  • Providing enrichment to the enclosure
  • Keeping relevant records and make bookings where applicable
  • Answering questions and queries from colleagues and visitors to the particular centre
Working Conditions: 

Animal Care Assistants typically work standard full-time hours. However as the animals need to be cared for seven days a week at all hours of the day a shift system for working is normally in place. This may include early starts, weekends, bank holiday and evening working.

Although a very rewarding career, tasks will include duties such as cleaning out animal pens and cages and emotional issues such as caring for sick or neglected animals and euthanasia. This role may also involve working outdoors in a variety of weather conditions.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live:

  • Starting salaries are usually in line with the national minimum wage
  • Experienced animal care assistants may earn up to £13,000 or more
  • Top salaries can exceed £14,000 a year.
Skills: 

 

  • Provide exercise opportunities for animals
  • Groom animals
  • Assist with loading and unloading animals for transport
  • Provide feed and water to animals
  • Assist with the care of young animals
  • Clean and Maintain animal accommodation
  • Restrain animals
Personal Qualities: 
  • Team player
  • Conscientious
  • Reliable
  • Good communication skills.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are around 13,300 animal care businesses throughout the UK and therefore many employment opportunities.  It is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest in animals, their care, behaviour and welfare
  • Enjoy working with people.

There are no set academic requirements to become an Animal Care Assistant, although some employers do ask for qualifications such as GCSE’s (grades A*-C) or their equivalence.

Previous experience of working with animals is valuable either in paid employment or as a volunteer, as is experience of working with people and customer care. A genuine concern and real enthusiasm for the welfare of animals is essential together with a willingness to learn about general animal care.

Organisations such as the RPSCA, PDSA and Blue Cross may be able to offer more information on volunteering opportunities.

Getting On: 

With relevant experience it may be possible to progress to a supervisory or management position. There may also be opportunities to diversify into other areas such as animal boarding, grooming or pet retail.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, magazines and journals:

  • VN Times
  • Your Dog
  • Your Cat
  • Horse and Hound
  • Fur and Feather
  • Pet Business World
  • Dogs Today
  • Dog World
  • Teaching Dogs.

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Animal Boarding Manager

Also known as: 

Kennel Manager; Cattery Manager.

Job Description: 

Animal Boarding Managers supervise the care of animals staying in boarding or quarantine establishments. In smaller businesses they may be involved with the day-to-day care of the animals, but in larger businesses their role may well be more involved with the management, supervisory and customer care side.

Animal Boarding Managers will also show owners and prospective customers around the premises and give advice on animal care. Administration work may be a large part of the role. 

This includes taking telephone bookings, dealing with payments, keeping records of vaccinations, diets, medications and any specific needs or behavioural problems. Records may be kept manually or on a computer.

Animal Boarding Managers work closely with staff, owners of animals and vets.

Working Conditions: 

Animal boarding establishments are open seven days a week and the Manager will have a key role making sure there is enough staff to cover the care of the animals and also to cater for owners collecting and leaving animals.

Early starts and evening work is common and weekend and Bank Holiday work expected. Work is organised on a rota basis with staff covering scheduled duties.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Animal Boarding Managers or Supervisors may earn around £15,000 per year or more.

Accommodation may also be provided.

Skills: 
  • Maintaining financial and legal records
  • Answering telephone calls
  • Greeting visitors to the premises
  • Supervising staff
  • Monitoring the standard of animal accommodation
  • Monitoring hygiene standards
  • Preparation of feeding regimes
  • Ordering of stock e.g. diets, bedding
  • Monitoring the health and welfare of the animals
  • Making sure that animals have facilities in their pens for exercise, rest and shelter.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good communication skills
  • Flexible and adaptable
  • Good organisation skills
  • Conscientious.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are estimated to be around 590 boarding kennels throughout the UK, employing over 2,700 people, so experience of business management and working with animals is valued.

Volunteering is a useful way to gain relevant experience while undertaking relevant qualifications, or you may have completed an apprenticeship.

It may be possible to progress from a Animal Boarding Assistant to the Manager in larger establishments.

Getting On: 

Some Animal Boarding Managers, with the necessary skills and experience, may go on to open their own animal boarding business.

Further Information: 

Further information can be found from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • VN Times

  • Your Dog

  • Your Cat

  • Fur and Feather

  • Pet Business World

  • Dogs Today

  • Dog World

  • Teaching Dogs

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Animal Boarding Assistant

Also known as: 

Kennel or cattery workers.

Job Description: 

Animal boarding workers care for animals staying in boarding or quarantine establishments usually whilst their owners are away.

The majority of boarding establishments are provided for dogs and cats. However, there are also boarding facilities available for other animals such as rabbits, guinea pigs, ferrets and parrots in addition to smaller animals including hamsters, mice, rats and budgies.

It is important to:

  • Have a genuine interest in dogs, cats and small animals, their care, behaviour and welfare
  • Enjoy working outdoors and on many practical tasks
  • Be able to communicate with a range of people.

Some establishments have space for just a few animals, while others for dogs and cats may have around one hundred at a time. Animal Boarding Assistants’ jobs may vary but the main tasks are usually:

  • Keeping accommodation clean and hygienic, changing bedding, sweeping out and removing waste
  • Preparing food for the animals
  • Preparing any special diets
  • Giving animals tablets or medicine if the animals need it
  • Grooming dogs and cats and keeping them clean
  • Exercising dogs by taking them for walks two or three times a day
  • Making sure that animals have facilities in their pens for exercise, rest and shelter
  • Answering telephone calls and greeting visitors to the premises
  • Ensuring the premises are clean and tidy.

Animal Boarding Assistants may also show owners and prospective customers around the premises and give advice on animal care.

Tools such as brushes, hoses or steam-cleaning machines are used to clean and sterilise the accommodation.

There may also be administration work to do. This includes taking telephone bookings, dealing with payments, keeping records of vaccinations, diets, medications and any specific needs or behavioural problems. Records may be kept manually or on computer.

Animal Boarding Assistants liaise closely with kennel owners or managers, other colleagues and vets.

Working Conditions: 

Animal boarding workers care for animals staying in boarding or quarantine establishments usually whilst their owners are away.

Animal Boarding Assistants work around 40 hours a week, sometimes longer if required. They often start early, from around 7.30am. Weekend and Bank Holiday work is usually expected and organised on a rota basis with other staff to cover scheduled duties through all hours, usually seven days a week. Part-time, seasonal and casual work is often available, as some boarding establishments need extra help during holiday periods.

Much of the work is outdoors, in all weathers. Kennel areas can sometimes be quite cold and often noisy. The work involves regular dog walking and bending to clean out kennels and animal cages.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and where people live.

  • Starting salaries are usually in line with the national minimum wage
  • Experienced boarding workers may earn up to £12,000 or more
  • Animal Boarding Managers or supervisors may earn around £15,000 or more.

Some larger boarding establishments provide accommodation, work overalls and may pay extra for overtime worked.

Skills: 
  • Keeping accommodation clean and hygienic, changing bedding, sweeping out and removing waste
  • Preparing food and special diets for the animals
  • Giving animals medication as required
  • Grooming dogs and cats and keeping them clean
  • Exercising dogs by taking them for walks two or three times a day
  • Making sure that animals have facilities in their pens for exercise, rest and shelter
  • Answering telephone calls and greeting visitors to the premises
  • Ensuring the premises are clean and tidy
  • Have a good awareness of health and safety issues.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Be confident working with a range of dogs and other animals
  • Be caring and patient
  • Be reliable and able to act on their own initiative
  • Have good communication skills
  • Work well alone and as part of a team.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Animal Care Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Animal Care

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Animal Care and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

There are estimated to be around 590 boarding kennels throughout the UK employing over 2,700 people. Animal Boarding Assistants workers are employed by private animal boarding businesses.

Animals may stay for short lengths of time, day-boarding is increasing or for longer periods. Animals entering the UK through quarantine are required to stay for six months.

Competition is often strong for full-time jobs. Many boarding establishments have part-time, seasonal and casual staff, and often volunteers.

There are no set academic qualifications required to become an animal boarding worker but some employers may prefer people with GCSEs grades (A*-C), especially maths or English.

Real enthusiasm and interest in working with small animals is very important. Experience of working in boarding establishments voluntarily or on work experience and indeed owning a pet is valuable.

Apprenticeships are available and provide an opportunity to gain employment in the industry.

Getting On: 

Promotion prospects may be limited in small boarding facilities. There may sometimes be opportunities in larger ones to progress to Animal Boarding Supervisor or Manager.

Animal boarding workers wishing to develop their skills can work towards gaining relevant qualifications for animal training or breeding. Some animal boarding workers, with the necessary skills and experience, may open their own animal boarding business.

Further Information: 

You can find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals (some may be priced):

  • Your Dog
  • Your Cat
  • Horse and Hound
  • Fur and Feather
  • Pet Business World
  • Dogs Today
  • Dog World
  • Animal Life
  • Dogs Monthly
  • Dogs World
  • Kennel and Cattery Management Magazine
  • FAB Boarding Cattery Manual
  • Defra Voluntary Code of Practice on the welfare of dogs and cats in quarantine premises

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

Agricultural Machinery Operator

Also known as: 

Combine Harvester Driver/Vegetable Harvester; Material Handler/Operator; Machinery Operator; Tractor Driver.

Job Description: 

An Agricultural Machinery Operator is involved with a wide range of activities on a farm from tractor driving to the harvesting of crops, which could be either cereals or vegetables, as well as the operation of any other agricultural machinery. 

 

The role will include the operation, maintenance and cleaning of the combine or machinery, and sometimes basic repairs. 

Agricultural Machinery Operators may work on a large farm or for an agricultural contractor.

 

Crops can include:

 

  • Combinable crops - these include wheat, barley, oats and sugar beet, some of which are grown for human consumption, others for animal feed
  • Vegetables - some may be sown directly from seed, others planted out as seedlings
  • Non-food crops - these include linseed, hemp, flax and oilseed rape
  • Energy crops - these can be grown for power and heat generation, and for the production of liquid fuels.
 
Working Conditions: 

Agricultural Machinery Operators generally work as least 39 hours per week but they are expected to work paid overtime when necessary. Early mornings, evenings and weekend work are all necessary during the busy seasons such as the harvest season bringing in crops whilst the weather is suitable.

 

The limited windows of opportunity for harvesting can mean working for long hours and ensuring the machinery is reliable and working at its optimum.

Work can be seasonal and required when the crops are ripe for harvesting. Drivers are likely to operate other agricultural machinery throughout the year depending on requirements.

Machinery can cost hundreds of thousands of pounds and are highly technical. Most machines will have an enclosed cab with air conditioning for the operators comfort and safety, computers to drive and provide the operator with the information on the crops they are harvesting.

Salary & Other Benefits: 

These figures are only a guide, as actual rates of pay may vary depending on the employer and individual employee’s skill and experience.

  • An agricultural machinery operator aged 19 and over could earn at least £14,986 a year
  • Experienced farm workers may earn up to £19,000.

Many farm workers may be given free or low-rent accommodation, or a lodging allowance.

Skills: 
  • Maintain good standards of health and safety for self and others
  • Maintain environmental good practice at work
  • Operate a power vehicle
  • Prepare a power vehicle for operation
  • Carry out maintenance procedures
  • Prepare equipment and machines for maintenance
  • Prepare power tools and attachments for use
  • Operate a tractor or other self-propelled vehicle and its attachments
  • Prepare harvested crops
  • Maintain and control harvesting operations
  • Maintain safe working with noise, dust or vibration (MSDs)
  • Operate plant and machinery.
Personal Qualities: 
  • Good timekeeping
  • Working alone
  • Initiative
  • Attention to detail
  • Problem-solving.
Qualifications and training: 

There are a variety of qualifications and training opportunities that can help you:

  • Learn more about your chosen area
  • find employment
  • improve your current skills
  • gain promotion
  • enhance job satisfaction

This a link to the Register of Regulated Qualification held by Ofqual and has been set up to search for a range qualifications in Agriculture Qualifications.  As this search includes all qualifications at different levels and different kinds, you may need to seek further assistance with your tutor or a local college as to the best ones to suit your needs. The qualifications listed on this website are suited if you are resident in England, Wales and Northern Ireland.

For those of you living in Scotland you need to search for qualifications with the Scottish Qualifications Authority. You will need to choose the type of qualification you are looking for and then search for qualifications available in Agriculture

You may also wish to find out about apprenticeships available in Agriculture and further information can be found on the National Apprenticeship Service website http://www.apprenticeships.org.uk/ for England.

If you are living in Wales follow this link to the Welsh Government website for more information about apprenticeships http://wales.gov.uk/topics/educationandskills/skillsandtraining/apprenticeships/?lang=en

If you are living in Northern Ireland this is the link to Department for Education and Learning for more information on apprenticeships http://www.delni.gov.uk/apprenticeshipsni

If you are living Scotland following this link for more information on modern apprenticeship available http://www.skillsdevelopmentscotland.co.uk/our-services/modern-apprenticeships/

Getting In: 

Agricultural Machinery Operators will have often gained experience in operating machinery through working as a farm worker on an arable farm or through working for a contractor.

Experience of operation, the crops and sometimes mechanics may be required to operate this expensive machinery.

Getting On: 

Agricultural Machinery Operators can gain further responsibility on very large farms/nurseries by leading a team, or becoming self-employed as an agricultural contractor offering a range of machinery and services to farms/nurseries, or with the right training take a different route to an Assistant Farm Manager.

Further Information: 

You can also find additional information from the following organisations and publications:

Industry information

Publications, Magazines and Journals:

Jobs

A to Z: 
Industry: 

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