Celebrating National Apprenticeship Week 2021
Man and woman repairing a dry stone wall
News

Published on

February 12 2021

This year’s 14th annual National Apprenticeship Week, with its theme of  'Build the Future’ came to a close today.

Between 8 and 14 February, businesses and further education centres across the UK were shining a light on and celebrating the amazing achievements of apprentices across the nation, particularly during these unprecedented times.

Apprenticeships offer a number of positive benefits to both individuals and employers; with young adults or individuals looking to change careers gaining a mix of on the job practical and knowledge-based training while earning a wage. For employers, apprentices bring new skills, perspectives and enthusiasm to the workplace.

To make sure the quality of qualifications and training is upheld throughout the apprenticeship journey, there are a number of standards and assessments apprentices and training centres need to adhere to. Lantra Awards is currently involved with the Apprenticeship Standards and the fulfilment of End Point Assessment (EPA).

Lantra currently offers 17s EPAs covering land-based industries including Animal Care, Arboriculture, Equine, Groundcare Maintenance, Horticulture and Livestock. You can find out more about EPA's here.

The team at Lantra is therefore thrilled to see the launch of the new Level 4 Countryside Ranger apprenticeship, which has been unveiled by the National Trust to coincide with National Apprenticeship Week.

The apprenticeship celebrates the partnership of some of the UK’s largest conservation organisations to help create this fantastic training opportunity to help shape and grow the countryside guardians of tomorrow.

The new Level 4 Countryside Ranger apprenticeship will help individuals wanting to progress within countryside management, and will help employers looking to hire someone new or upskill existing employees. Once complete, apprentices will be qualified in roles such as countryside, community or recreation rangers, reserve or countryside wardens, estate supervisor or estate and park rangers.

Jonathan Mitchell, Deputy Director for Standards Development at the Institute for Apprenticeships and Technical Education, said: “This apprenticeship has grown out of the hard work and dedication of a committed group of employers, who have put their time into making this a reality even in these uncertain and challenging times.

The Countryside Ranger apprenticeship will be particularly exciting news for countryside workers, giving a clear route for progression and a chance to build a career inspiring people to look after our green spaces.”

Lantra, along with other employers, training Providers and professional bodies from across the countryside management sector, have helped design and develop the new qualification as part of the Countryside Ranger Trailblazer group, led by National Trust Dartmoor ranger Demelza Hyde.

You can find out more about the Level 4 Countryside Worker Apprenticeship via the standards document here.